Sep 132018
 

United States capital was established temporarily in New York in 1788 by the Constitutional Convention. The city remained the capital until August 12, 1790. The capital moved back to Philadelphia before it finally moved to Washington, DC.

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Oct 312018
 

Earl Lloyd in 1950 became the first African American to play for the NBA. He played for the Washington Capitols at a game held in Rochester, New York.

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Nov 052018
 
Shirley Chisholm

Shirley Chisholm

Shirley Chisholm was the first African-American woman to be elected to the House of Representatives. Representing the 12th congressional district from New York, she was elected in 1968, and she served until 1983. She also ran unsuccessfully for President in 1972. Chisholm died in 2005.

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Nov 072018
 

Museum of Modern Art in New York, New York, opened its doors in 1929. Children could view some of the artworks online at: MOMA.

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Nov 132018
 

Holland Tunnel began operating in 1927. Named after its designer, Clifford Milburn Holland, the tunnel connects New Jersey and Manhattan; and it runs under the Hudson River. It was the first American underwater tunnel. The designers had to build gigantic fans that would remove carbon monoxide, generated by the cars, from the tunnel.

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Jan 212019
 
Concorde

Concorde

Concorde flew for the first time in 1976. A British company and a French company formed a joint cooperation to fund and build 20 Concorde planes. The planes mainly flew from London and Paris to New York and Washington, DC. Flights were expensive, but passengers arrived at their destinations in less than half the usual flight time. Due to less travel after September 11, 2001, and increased costs, the planes were retired on November 26, 2003.

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Feb 212019
 

Polaroid camera was patented in 1947 in New York, New York, by Edwin H. Land. Older children can read an interesting article about Land and the Polaroid at: Polaroid Camera.

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Mar 102019
 

Harriet TubmanHarriet Tubman died in Auburn, New York, in 1913. Her exact date of birth is unknown. She was born around 1820 in Dorchester County, Maryland. A slave, she escaped to Philadelphia in 1849. She then became the most famous conductor for the Underground Railroad, probably saving about 900 people. During the Civil War, she acted as a spy and a scout. After the war, she cared for orphans and the aged. Children may want to read Ann McGovern’s Wanted Dead or Alive: The Story of Harriet Tubman. Children could also learn more about her life at: Harriet Tubman.

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Apr 082019
 

First synagogue in United States was built. The Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue (Shearith Israel) opened its doors in 1654 in New York, New York. The synagogue continues to thrive today.

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Apr 132019
 

Metropolitan Museum of Art opened its doors for the first time in 1870. It contains over 200 galleries and possesses over three million pieces of art. Idea: Consider reading From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. Two siblings run away to the museum. They solve a mystery, and readers learn a great deal about the museum. Children can visit the museum website at: http://www.metmuseum.org/.

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