Aug 272016
 
Moldova Flag

Flag of Moldova

Moldova celebrates Independence Day. It broke away from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in 1991. Two of its boundaries are formed by the Dneister and Prut Rivers. This landlocked country, slightly larger than the state of Maryland, has fertile soil that promotes good agriculture. About 3.6 million people live in Moldova, and Chisinau is the capital.

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Aug 272016
 

First North American drama was performed in 1655 in Acoma, Virginia. Ye Bare and Ye Cubb was written by Phillip A. Bruce. Virginia was one of the few colonies that did not prohibit production of plays.

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Aug 272016
 

Oil WellPetroleum was discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania, in 1859. W. A. Smith found oil as he was sinking a shaft in Pennsylvania. The rig was soon producing twenty barrels of crude oil a day. Children can learn more about oil production and refinement at: http://www.eia.gov/kids/energy.cfm?page=oil_home-basics

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Aug 272016
 

Confucius (born Lu, China, 551 BC; died 479 BC) was a great Chinese philosopher. His philosophy stresses proper relationships with others and personal responsibility. Children could read Confucius: The Golden Rule by Russell Freedman.

Lyndon Baines Johnson

Lyndon Baines Johnson

Lyndon B. Johnson (born near Stonewall, Texas, 1908; died San Antonio, Texas, January 22, 1973) was the 36th president (1963-1969) of the United States. He fought during World War II and was awarded the Silver Star. After the war, he was elected first to the House of Representatives and then to the Senate. He represented the state of Texas. He soon became the Senate Majority Leader. He was John Kennedy’s vice president and became president when Kennedy was assassinated. Important issues included the War on Poverty and the civil rights movement. The Vietnam War divided the country emotionally, and he did not seek another term in office. Children could visit a website at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/lyndonbjohnson.

Suzy Kline (born Berkeley, California, 1943) writes books for children. She is the author of the Horrible Harry books and the Herbie Jones series. Children could visit her website at: http://www.suzykline.com/.

Arlene Mosel (born Cleveland, Ohio, 1921; died Indianapolis, Indiana, May 1996) was a librarian and author. She is most known for writing Tikki Tkki Tembo and The Funny Little Woman. Blair Lent received the 1973 Caldecott Medal for the illustrations in the latter book.

Ann Rinaldi (born New York, New York, 1934) has written more than 40 books for children. Her works include Girl in Blue and The Redheaded Princess.

Suzanne Fisher Staples (born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1945) writes books for children. Her works include Shabanu, which received a 1990 Newbery Honor Award. She also wrote The House of Djinn.  Children can learn more at: http://suzannefisherstaples.com/

Mother Teresa (born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in Skopje, Yugoslavia, 1910; died Calcutta, India, September 5, 1997) was a missionary working with the poor in India. She received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979 for her work. Children could read Mother Teresa by Demi.

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Aug 282016
 

Henry Hudson in 1609 ventured into the Delaware Bay. He was exploring for the Dutch. Idea: Children could look at a map of Delaware Bay. They could find out how far upstream large ships can travel.

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Aug 282016
 

suffragistsTen women’s rights campaigners were arrested in 1917 while picketing outside the White House. The suffragists had started picketing in January. One of the leaders, Alice Paul, began a hunger strike in jail. President Woodrow Wilson was so concerned for his administration that he finally supported a Constitutional Amendment so that women could vote. Children could learn more at: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/jazz/jb_jazz_sufarrst_1.html.

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Aug 282016
 
  • Martin Luther King delivered his I Have a Dream speech in 1963 in front of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC. Children can read the original text at: http://www.archives.gov/press/exhibits/dream-speech.pdf.
  • MLK Monu

    Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

    Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial was dedicated in 2001 in Washington, DC. Situated between the Jefferson Memorial and the Lincoln Memorial, the very impressive Stone of Hope statue by Lei Yixin stands 28 feet 6 inches tall. Children could learn more at: http://www.nps.gov/mlkm/index.htm.

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Aug 282016
 

Roger Duvoisin (born Geneva, Switzerland, 1904, died Morristown, New Jersey, June 30, 1980) was a children’s author and illustrator. One of his main characters in a series was Petunia. He received the 1948 Caldecott Award for White Snow, Bright Snow. He also earned 1966 Caldecott Honor Award for Hide and Seek Frog. Children could learn more at: http://www.bookologymagazine.com/resources/authors-emeritus/duvoisin-roger/

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (born Frankfurt am Main, Germany, 1749; died Weimar, Germany, March 22, 1832) was a philosopher, scientist, and writer. One of his greatest works is the verse play Faust. Older children can read many of his works at: http://www.gutenberg.org/.

Kevin Hawkes (born Sherman, Texas, 1959) illustrates books for children. He has illustrated Island of the Aunts and Library Lion. Children can visit his webpage at: http://www.kevinhawkes.com/home.htm.

Lucy Ware Webb Hayes

Lucy Ware Webb Hayes (born , Ohio, 1831; died Fremont, Ohio, June 25, 1889) was the wife of Rutherford B. Hayes, nineteenth president of the United States. She visited the Civil War battle sites to care for the wounded. She served as first lady of Ohio when her husband was elected governor. Because she believed in the temperance movement, alcohol was not served in the White House when she was first lady. Visit a website at: http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=20.

Brian Pinkney (born Boston, Massachusetts, 1961) writes and illustrates books for children. His illustrations in When I Left My Village earned him the 1996 Sydney Taylor Older Reader Award. He received a 1996 Caldecott Honor Award for The Faithful Friend and a 1999 Caldecott Honor Award for Duke Ellington: The Piano Prince and His Orchestra. He earned four Coretta Scott King Honor Awards: in 1993 for Sukey and the Mermaid, in 1996 for The Faithful Friend, in 1997 for Minty: A Story of Young Harriet Tubman, and in 2005 for God Bless the Child. He received the 2000 Coretta Scott King Medal for In the Time of the Drums. Children could visit his website at: http://www.brianpinkney.net/main.html.

Allen Say (born Yokohama, Japan, 1937) writes and illustrates books for children. His book Grandfather’s Journey received the 1994 Caldecott Medal. His works also include Home of the Brave and Drawing from Memory.

Tasha Tudor (born Boston, Massachusetts, 1915; died Marlboro, Vermont, June 18, 2008) wrote and/or illustrated almost 100 books for children. She earned the 1945 Caldecott Medal for Mother Goose and the 1957 Caldecott Medal for 1 is One.

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Aug 292016
 

Shays’ Rebellion started formally in 1786. Daniel Shays and other farmers in central Massachusetts were revolting against high taxes and debt policies. At that time if people could not pay their debts, they were put in prison. The resistance was broken around February 1787, and the last vestiges concluded in June 1787. Some experts believe that Shays’ Rebellion influenced members of the Constitutional Convention.

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Aug 292016
 

The Philanthropist, the first abolitionist newspaper, was printed in 1817. Charles Osborn published the newspaper in Mount Pleasant, Ohio.

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