Feb 202019
 

Frederick Douglass died in Anacostia Heights, DC, in 1895. He was born in Tuckahoe, Maryland, probably in February 1818. He escaped from slavery and became a popular abolitionist and speaker. Children can learn more at Frederick Douglass.  Children can also read some of his works at Project Gutenberg.

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Mar 252019
 

Maryland was colonized by Lord Baltimore’s group in 1634. Catholics and protestants arrived on two ships, the Ark and the Dove. Lord Baltimore wanted to establish a colony where Catholics would not be persecuted.

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Apr 282019
 
Maryland State Flag

Maryland State Flag

Maryland became the seventh state in the United States by ratifying the Constitution in 1788. Maryland ranks 42nd in size and 19th in population. Annapolis is the state capital, and the state’s nicknames include Old Line State and Free State. It is famous for crab cakes and its Chesapeake Bay Bridge. Children could visit a website at: Maryland. They could find out how Maryland, Baltimore, and Annapolis got their names.

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May 242019
 

First telegraph message was sent by Samuel F. B. Morse in 1844. The message, “What hath God wrought?” was sent from Washington, DC, to Baltimore, Maryland. Idea: Children could send messages to one another in Morse code. They could learn more at: First Telegram.

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Oct 052019
 
Thomas_Stone

Thomas Stone

Thomas Stone died in Alexandria, Virginia, in 1787. He was born in Charles County, Maryland, sometime in 1743. Representing Maryland, he signed the Declaration of Independence. He also served on the committee that wrote the Articles of Confederation. He did not attend the Constitutional Convention because his wife was very ill. She died in June 1787, and he died four months later.

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Oct 102019
 
Naval Cadets Photographed between 1890 and 1901

Naval Cadets Photographed between 1890 and 1901

United States Naval Academy opened in Annapolis, Maryland, in 1845. Fifty students were taught by seven professors. Today the academy has an enrollment around 4500, and the academic staff exceeds 500.

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Nov 152019
 

Jeremiah Dixon and Charles Mason started to survey the Mason-Dixon Line in 1763. This line marked the border between Pennsylvania and Maryland. They finished their work on December 26, 1767. Originally their work was to settle a very contentious land dispute between the Penn family (Pennsylvania) and the Calvert family (Maryland). Later, as the Civil War approached, the line somewhat divided the country into the north and the south. Older children can learn much, much more at: Mason-Dixon Line.

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Nov 162019
 

Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer died on November 16, 1790. His exact date of birth is unknown. He represented Maryland at the Constitutional Convention. Before the Revolutionary War, he was active in settling border disputes between Maryland and Pennsylvania.

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Dec 012019
 
District of Columbia Flag

District of Columbia Flag

Washington, DC, became the capital of the United States in 1800. Parts of Virginia and Maryland were combined to make the new capital. Charles L’Enfant created the architectural plan for the city. The federal government is the largest employer, and printing is the biggest industry. Over seventeen million tourists visit the nation’s capital every year. Children could locate some of the many important buildings on a map of Washington, DC.

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Dec 232019
 
Map of Nation's Capital (Residence Act)

Map of Nation’s Capital (Residence Act)

Maryland in 1788 donated ten square miles of land to the United States. This land became part of the District of Columbia. Our Founding Fathers wanted to establish a new capital, rather than use an existing city such as New York or Philadelphia. The Residence Act gave George Washington the authority to decide where to locate the new nation’s capital. The Maryland land was in about the middle of the country at that time. Children can view the documents that made the District of Columbia possible at: District of Columbia.

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