celebrateandlearn

Nov 262019
 
Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Pumpkins and Squash

Thanksgiving is only two days away! Many communities host parades on Thanksgiving Day. Today children could organize a parade either indoor or outdoor that would be held on Thursday. They could make “floats” by decorating cardboard boxes and attaching pull strings. They could practice marching and playing kazoos. They could also create an original Thanksgiving song to perform during the parade. They could read The Thanksgiving Door by Debby Atwell. Also, author Jan Brett’s website is filled with Thanksgiving activities: http://www.janbrett.com.

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Nov 262019
 

Thanksgiving Day was celebrated nationally for the first time in 1789. President Washington issued a proclamation declaring that the day should be one of prayer and thanksgiving. Children could research what the first Thanksgiving meal was. How does it compare to what they eat on the holiday today? In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed that Thanksgiving would be celebrated on the last Thursday in November. In 1941 Congress passed a resolution changing Thanksgiving to the fourth Thursday in November. Children can read about “The Year We Had Two Thanksgivings” at: Two Thanksgivings.

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Nov 262019
 
Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth died in 1883 in Battle Creek, Michigan. She was born a slave in Alster County, New York, possibly in the year 1797. She became a free woman after the New York Emancipation Act of 1827. She became an itinerant preacher, speaking for the cause of abolition. She became famous for her speaking, and she met Abraham Lincoln in the White House in 1864. After the Civil War, she campaigned for women’s rights. Idea: Children could read portions of the book Sojourner Truth: Ain’t I a Woman? by Patricia McKissack. They could read a transcript of her “Ain’t I a Woman?” speech at: Sojourner Truth.

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Nov 262019
 

Alice in WonderlandAlice in Wonderland was published in 1865. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson wrote the book under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. The book spawned plays, ballets, movies, cartoons, and comic books. Children can read various versions of the book at: Project Gutenberg.

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Nov 262019
 
Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument was created from Custer Battlefield National Monument in 1991. A monument to the Native Americans who fought at Custer’s Last Stand was also approved. Children can visit the National Park Service  website, which provides some great photos, at: http://www.nps.gov/libi.

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Nov 262019
 

Doris Gates (born Mountain View, California, 1901; died Carmel, California, September 3, 1987) wrote books for children. She received a Newbery Honor Award for Blue Willow in 1941. Her works also include The Cat and Mrs. Cary and The Elderberry Bush. Children can learn more at: Doris Gates.

Bat Masterson (born Henryville, Quebec, Canada, 1853; died New York, New York, October 25, 1921) was a gambler and a lawman of the Old West.

Laurence Pringle (born Rochester, New York, Rochester, New York, 1935) has written at least 100 books, mostly about nature, for children. His works include Owls! Strange and Wonderful and Scorpions! Children can visit his website at: Laurence Pringle.

Charles Schulz (born Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1922; died Santa Rosa, California, February 12, 2000) was a cartoonist and the creator of Peanuts. Students could read and discuss some of the Peanuts cartoons. They could try to draw their own cartoons. Children can learn more at: http://schulzmuseum.org/.

 

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Nov 272019
 

Thanksgiving Pumpkins

Thanksgiving is tomorrow! Today children could make placemats (construction paper and markers) or nametags or table decorations. They could figure out how many smaller words they can make from the phrase “Happy Thanksgiving” or the phrase “Run Away and Hide, Turkey.” Children could read  The Night Before Thanksgiving by Natasha Wing or visit the Scholastic site at: Thanksgiving.

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Nov 272019
 

Williamsburg, Virginia, began restoration processes in 1926. Colonial Williamsburg, along with Jamestown and Yorktown, form the Historic Triangle. About four million people visit the region each year. Colonial Williamsburg has a great website for children at: Williamsburg.

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Nov 272019
 

Anders Celsius (born Uppsala, Sweden, 1701; died Uppsala, Sweden, April 25, 1744) was an astronomer. However, he is most famous for his Celsius temperature scale. In the Celsius (centigrade) Scale, water freezes at 0 degress, and water boils at 100 degrees. Children could compare and contrast the Fahrenheit Scale with the Celsius Scale. They could also research where these scales are used. Children could learn more at: Celsius.

Kevin Henkes (born Racine, Wisconsin, 1960) is a children’s author and illustrator. One of his books is Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse. His Circle Dogs received the 1999 Charlotte Zolotow Award: Highly Commended. Henkes received a 2004 Caldecott Honor Award for Owen. Kitten’s First Full Moon was awarded the 2005 Caldecott Medal, and Olive’s Ocean received the 2004 Newbery Honor Award. He received a 2016 Caldecott Honor Award for Waiting. His amazing website is absolutely loaded with activities: Kevin Henkes.

Robert R. Livingston

Robert R. Livingston (born New York, New York, 1746; died Clermont, New York, February 26, 1813) was a patriot, a member of the Continental Congress, and a diplomat. Representing New York, he was one of the Committee of Five, the representatives who drafted the Declaration of Independence. A fervent believer in independence, he was recalled to New York and did not sign the Declaration. He delivered the presidential oath to George Washington at the inauguration in 1789. He was Minister to France from 1801 to 1804 and therefore he negotiated the Louisiana Purchase.

The Egg TreeKatherine Milhous (born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1894; died Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 5, 1977) was a writer and an illustrator. She wrote and/or illustrated over 15 books. One of her books, The Egg Tree, received the 1951 Caldecott Medal.

Bill Nye (born Washington, DC, 1955) is an educator, writer, scientist, and TV personality. He hosted “Bill Nye the Science Guy” on television from 1993 to 1998. He continues to be active in the combined fields of science and education. Children could spend days at his amazing website: Bill Nye.

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Nov 282019
 
Creation by Sandie Obrin

Creation by Sandie Obrin

Thanksgiving is today, a day of family and food. It is also a time to remember our country’s history and accomplishments. Children could make Thanksgiving jigsaw puzzles by finding pictures with a family theme or a Thanksgiving theme. Then they could glue the pictures onto a manila folder. The last step is to cut them into puzzle pieces and share with other children. Remember to include time for the Thanksgiving parade the children organized on Tuesday. Children could also visit the National Geographic site, loaded with correct historical information and all kinds of games and activities: Thanksgiving Day. Children could also read Thank You, Sarah: The Woman Who Saved Thanksgiving by Laurie Halse Anderson.

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