Sep 152021
 

Mabel C. Bragg (born Milford, Massachusetts, 1870; died April 25, 1945) wrote children’s books. Some experts have attributed her to be the author of The Little Engine That Could. However, others feel that Arnold Munk, a publisher using the pseudonym Watty Piper, wrote the book. Still others believe the story to be a version found in folk literature.

Agatha Christie (born Torquay, England, 1890; died Wallingford, England, January 12, 1976) was a writer, best known for her mysteries. Older children can read seven of her books at: Project Gutenberg.

James Fenimore Cooper (born Burlington, New Jersey, 1789; died Cooperstown, New York, September 14, 1851) was a writer and a historian. Two of his most famous works are The Last of the Mohicans and The Pathfinder. Children can read many of his works at: Project Gutenberg. Children can learn more at: James Fenimore Cooper.

Tomie dePaola (born Meriden, Connecticut, 1934; died Lebanon, New Hampshire, March 30, 2020) wrote and/or illustrated over 250 books for children. He received a 1976 Caldecott Honor Award for Strega Nona, a 2002 Newbery Honor Award for 26 Fairmount Avenue, and the 2011 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for his body of work. Children could visit a website devoted to him at: Tomie DePaola.

Make Way for Ducklings

Make Way for Ducklings

Robert McCloskey (born Hamilton, Ohio, 1914; died Deer Isle, Maine, June 30, 2003) was a children’s author and illustrator. He earned two Caldecott Medals: one in 1942 for Make Way for Ducklings and one in 1958 for Time of Wonder. He also received three Caldecott Honor Awards: one in 1949 for Blueberries for Sal, in 1953 for One Morning in Maine, and one in 1954 for JohnnyCake, Ho! His book Make Way for Ducklings is now the official state children’s book for Massachusetts. Children can learn more at: Robert McCloskey.

William Howard Taft

William Howard Taft

William Howard Taft (born Cincinnati, Ohio, 1857; died Washington. D. C., March 8, 1930) was the twenty-seventh president (1909-1913) of the United States. He weighed over three hundred pounds. In 1900 he was in charge of the Philippines. In 1904 Theodore Roosevelt made Taft Secretary of War. He was president of the country during a difficult period. After he concluded his term as president, he became a Supreme Court Justice in 1921. Children could visit a website at: William Howard Taft. Idea: Taft was the only president who also served on the Supreme Court. Children could locate more presidential facts and create a trivia game.

Share Button
Nov 052021
 

“The Mousetrap,” a mystery play by Agatha Christie, opened in London in 1952. Nightly performances of the play continued until March 6, 2020, when COVID-19 caused the theater to close. The theater reopened in may 2021

Share Button