Jul 042022
 

Calvin Coolidge

Calvin Coolidge (born Plymouth, Vermont, 1872; died Northampton, Massachusetts, January 15, 1933) was the thirtieth president (1923-1929) of the United States. He was elected governor of Massachusetts in 1918 and was vice president when Harding died. Nicknamed “Silent Cal,” he stressed respectability in government. The stock market went up, and he cut governmental costs. He was more concerned with matters within the country than with foreign affairs. He declined to run in 1928, even though he was a popular figure. Children could visit a website at: Calvin Coolidge.

Stephen Foster (born Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania, 1826; died New York, New York, January 13, 1864) was a songwriter. He composed almost two hundred songs, including “Camptown Races” and “Swanee River.

Jamie Gilson (born Beardstown, Illinois, 1933; died Wilmette, Illinois, February 11, 2020) wrote 21 books for children. Her books include Hello, My Name Is Scrambled Eggs and Do Bananas Chew Gum? Children can visit her website at: Jamie Gilson.

Rube Goldberg (born San Francisco, 1883; died New York, New York, December 7, 1970) was a cartoonist. He created on paper intricate machines that would activate each other to perform one simple task. Idea: Students could see some of his cartoons and then draw their own Rube Goldbergs. Children can visit a great website at: Rube Goldberg.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne in Salem, Massachusetts, 1804; died New Hampshire, May 18 or 19, 1864) was a writer. Two of his most famous works are The Scarlet Letter and The House of Seven Gables. He wrote at least 100 stories for magazines. Children can read his works at: http://www.gutenberg.org/.

Henrietta Swan Leavitt (born Lancaster, Massachusetts, 1868; died Cambridge, Massachusetts, December 12, 1921) was an astronomer. Women at that time period did not hold prestigious jobs in astronomy, but she did “clerical work” with certain stars and their luminosity. Her work enabled Edwin Hubble to complete his work and to find that the universe is expanding. Children could read Miss Leavitt’s Stars: The Untold Story of the Woman Who Discovered How to Measure the Universe by George Johnson.

Jordan Sonnenblick (born Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, 1969) writes books for young adults. His books include After Ever After and Dodger and Me. Children can visit his website at: Jordan Sonnenblick.

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Jul 052022
 

Venezuela celebrates Independence Day. Spain gave up control of the country in 1821. Located in northern South America, Venezuela is about twice the size of California. It has a tropical climate, and petroleum provides a major portion of its economy. About 28.5 million people live in the country, and most of the cities are located along the Caribbean coastline. Caracas is the capital. Over eight million people live in Venezuela. Children can learn more at: Venezuela. Children could print and color a page about Venezuela at: Venezuela Art.

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Jul 052022
 
Flag of Isle of Man

Flag of Isle of Man

Isle of Man celebrates Tynwald Day. The island, located in the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland, is about three times the size of Washington, DC. It is a British crown dependency but not part of the United Kingdom. Not quite 85,000 people live there, and Douglas is the capital. Its economy is based on tourism and small manufacturing. Children can learn more at: Isle of Man.

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Jul 052022
 

Republic of Cabo Verde (previously known as Cape Verde) celebrates Independence Day. Portugal relinquished all claims to the country in 1975. During the exploration period, the islands served as supply stations. During the last century, whaling became an important source of income. The country is actually composed of fifteen islands, and the combined area is about the size of Rhode Island. The climate is temperate, but water is scarce and droughts are common. About a half million people live in this country west of Africa. Praia is the capital. Children can learn more at: Republic of Cabo Verde.

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Jul 052022
 

Staffordshire Hoard was discovered in a field near Litchfield, England, in 2009. Over 3,500 items (mostly gold and silver) were found buried, and most of the items were made around the 7th century AD. The items are mostly military; no household items or women’s jewelry were found. Children can learn more at: http://www.staffordshirehoard.org.uk/.

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Jul 052022
 

Phineas Taylor Barnum (born Bethel, Connecticut, 1810; died Bridgeport, Connecticut, April 7, 1891) created Barnum’s American Museum in 1842. It featured unusual acts. He went on to highlight the talents of the singer, Jenny Lind. He opened “The Greatest Show on Earth” in 1871. Later he merged his business interests with J. A. Bailey and formed the Barnum and Bailey Circus. Idea: Children could create their own “Greatest Show on Earth.”

Sylvester Graham (born West Suffield, Connecticut, 1794; died Northampton, Massachusetts, September 11, 1851) was a minister and physician who invented the graham cracker. He was a member of the temperance movement and an early vegetarian. He developed graham flour, a course-ground type of whole wheat. Does his birthday inspire S’Mores?

Meredith Ann Pierce (born Seattle, Washington, 1958) writes fantasy books for young adults. Her work includes the Darkangel trilogy and the Firebringer trilogy. Children could visit her website at: http://www.moonandunicorn.com/.

John Schoenherr (born New York, New York, 1935; died Easton, Pennsylvania, April 8, 2010) was an illustrator. He illustrated 40 books for children, and he received the 1968 Caldecott Medal for Jane Yolan’s Owl Moon. He also illustrated Sterling North’s Rascal. He is perhaps best known for his illustrations of Frank Herbert’s Dune.

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Jul 062022
 

Malawi celebrates Republic Day. It received its independence from Great Britain in 1964. This landlocked country, slightly smaller than the state of Pennsylvania, is located in central Africa. Almost 17 million people live in the country. One of its major industries is the processing of foods, including tea, sugar, and tobacco. Lilongwe is the capital. Children could learn more at: Malawi.

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Jul 062022
 

Comoros celebrates Independence Day. Comoros declared its independence from France in 1975. This archipelago is located in the Mozambique Channel, and the country is smaller than Rhode Island. Over 700,000 people live on the islands. Its major industries are perfume distillation and fishing. Moroni is the capital. Children could learn more at: Comoros.

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Jul 062022
 

Antirabies inoculation was administered safely for the first time by Louis Pasteur in 1885. He saved a child who had been bitten by a rabid dog.

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Jul 062022
 

Babe Ruth

Major League All-Star Game was held for the first time in 1933 in Comiskey Park, Chicago, Illinois. Players included Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. Planned as a one-time event, the very successful All-Star game has been played every year since then, except 1945 (World War II) and 2020 (Covid-19 Pandemic). Children could learn more, including a list of every All-Star Game, at: Baseball.

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