Jul 232019
 

Flag of Egypt

Egypt celebrates Revolution Day. The area of Egypt is about the size of Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada combined. A desert country bordering the Mediterranean Sea, Egypt is home to the pyramids of Giza. The Nile flows from south to north through the country. Over 85 million people live in Egypt, and most of them live along the Nile or the Mediterranean Coast.  Cairo is the capital.

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Jul 232019
 

Comet Hale-Bopp was discovered in 1995. Alan Hale in New Mexico and Thomas Bopp in Arizona, independent of each other, reported the extremely bright comet’s existence. It became visible in May 1996 and remained so until December 1997. Experts believe large telescopes will be able to monitor it until 2020. It may reappear around the year 4385.

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Jul 232019
 

Eileen Collins

Eileen Collins became the first female commander of a space vehicle, Columbia, in 1999. During the mission she and the crew deployed the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which provides data on black holes and exploding stars. Older children could visit a website at: Eileen Collins.

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Jul 232019
 

Solar Impulse completed its circumnavigation of earth in 2016. Using only solar energy, the Swiss airplane started its flight from Abu Dhabi, United Emirates, in March 9, 2015. Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg, the co-founders, wanted to show that flight was possible using only solar energy.

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Jul 232019
 

Patricia Coombs (born Los Angeles, California, 1926) writes and illustrates books for children. She writes the Dorrie the Little Witch series.

Robert Quackenbush (born Hollywood, California, 1929) has written at least 110 books and illustrated at least 60 books. He writes the Miss Mallard series. Children could visit his website at: http://www.rquackenbush.com/.

Vera Rubin (born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1928; died Princeton, New Jersey, December 25, 2016) was an astronomer who studied galactic rotation curves. Her work led to the concept of dark matter.

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Jul 242019
 

Detroit was founded in 1701. Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac arrived at the site of present-day Detroit. Fort Pontchartrain du Detroit was the area’s first construction. The French built the fort originally to keep British settlers from moving west. After the French and Indian War, the fort was turned over to the British. During the Revolutionary War, the fort was too far west to see much action. The British did not relinquish control of Fort Detroit until 1796, thirteen years after the Treaty of Paris. A conflagration hit the Detroit area in 1805, and experts believe no part of the original fort still stands.

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Jul 242019
 
Machu_Picchu_early_morning

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu was discovered by Hiram Bingham in 1911. Built around 1450 high in the Andes, the “Lost City of the Incas” was probably built for their leader Pachacuti. Bingham, a historian from Yale University, was looking for another city when a local guide brought him to Machu Piccu. The area was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983. Children can learn more at: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/274.

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Jul 242019
 

Cousins Day was created by Claudia A. Evart. Idea: Children could write postcards to their cousins.

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Jul 242019
 

Esther Averill (born Bridgeport, Connecticut, 1902; died New York, New York, May 19, 1992) wrote and illustrated books for children. She is best known for The Cat Club series, twelve books about a cat named Jenny Linsky and her feline friends.

Simon Bolivar (born Caracas, Venezuela, 1783; died Santa Marta, Colombia, December 17, 1830) was a South American patriot, often known as “The Liberator.”

Alexandre Dumas (born Villers-Cotterets, France, 1802; died near Dieppe, France, December 5, 1870) was a prolific French writer of action/adventure books. His works include The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers. Children can read many of his works at: Project Gutenberg.

Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart (born Atchison, Kansas, 1898; disappeared Pacific Ocean, July 2, 1937) was a famous aviator. In 1932 she became the first woman to solo across the Atlantic Ocean. The trip took thirteen hours and thirty minutes. She also flew from Hawaii to California in 1935. Around July 2, 1937, she and her navigator, while attempting to circumnavigate the world, went missing under unusual circumstances; their bodies and plane have yet to be found. Children could learn more at: Amelia Earhart.

Amy Ehrlich (born New York, New York, 1942) writes books for children. Her works include Rachel: The Story of Rachel Carson and Kazam’s Magic.

Sherry Garland (born McAllen, Texas, 1948) writes fiction and nonfiction for children. Her books include The Buffalo Soldier and Voices of the Alamo. Children can visit her website at: http://www.sherrygarland.com/.

Charlotte Pomerantz  (born Brooklyn, New York, 1930) has written at least 35 books for children. The Princess and the Admiral received the 1975 Jane Addams Book Award, and If I Had a Paka: Poems in Eleven Languages earned a 1983 Jane Addams Honor Award.

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Jul 252019
 

Flag of Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico celebrates Constitution Day. Also called Commonwealth Day, the day celebrates the island’s 1952 constitution adoption. A United States territory, this Caribbean island is a bit less than three times the size of Rhode Island. Although it has a tropical climate, the country often experiences droughts and hurricanes. About 3.7 million people live in Puerto Rico, and many of the inhabitants have jobs related to dairy farming, sugar production, or tourism. More than 3.6 million tourists visit Puerto Rico each year. San Juan is the capital.

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