Jul 242024
 

Detroit was founded in 1701. Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac arrived at the site of present-day Detroit. Fort Pontchartrain du Detroit was the area’s first construction. The French built the fort originally to keep British settlers from moving west. After the French and Indian War, the fort was turned over to the British. During the Revolutionary War, the fort was too far west to see much action. The British did not relinquish control of Fort Detroit until 1796, thirteen years after the Treaty of Paris. A conflagration hit the Detroit area in 1805, and experts believe no part of the original fort still stands.

Jul 242024
 
Machu_Picchu_early_morning

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu was discovered by Hiram Bingham in 1911. Built around 1450 high in the Andes, the “Lost City of the Incas” was probably built for their leader Pachacuti. Bingham, a historian from Yale University, was looking for another city when a local guide brought him to Machu Piccu. The area was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983. Children can learn more at: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/274.

Jul 242024
 

Esther Averill (born Bridgeport, Connecticut, 1902; died New York, New York, May 19, 1992) wrote and illustrated books for children. She is best known for The Cat Club series, twelve books about a cat named Jenny Linsky and her feline friends.

Simon Bolivar (born Caracas, Venezuela, 1783; died Santa Marta, Colombia, December 17, 1830) was a South American patriot, often known as “The Liberator.” Children could read A Picture Book of Simon Bolivar, by David A. Adler.

Alexandre Dumas (born Villers-Cotterets, France, 1802; died near Dieppe, France, December 5, 1870) was a prolific French writer of action/adventure books. His works include The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers. Children can read many of his works at: Project Gutenberg.

Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart (born Atchison, Kansas, 1898; disappeared Pacific Ocean, July 2, 1937) was a famous aviator. In 1932 she became the first woman to solo across the Atlantic Ocean. The trip took thirteen hours and thirty minutes. She also flew from Hawaii to California in 1935. Around July 2, 1937, she and her navigator, while attempting to circumnavigate the world, went missing under unusual circumstances; their bodies and plane have yet to be found. Children could learn more at: Amelia Earhart.

Amy Ehrlich (born New York, New York, 1942) has written at least 35 books for children. Her works include Rachel: The Story of Rachel Carson and Kazam’s Magic.

Sherry Garland (born McAllen, Texas, 1948) writes fiction and nonfiction for children. Her more than 30 books include The Buffalo Soldier and Voices of the Alamo. Children can visit her website at: http://www.sherrygarland.com/.

Charlotte Pomerantz  (born Brooklyn, New York, 1930; died Charlottesville, Virginia, July 24, 2022) wrote at least 35 books for children. The Princess and the Admiral received the 1975 Jane Addams Book Award, and If I Had a Paka: Poems in Eleven Languages earned a 1983 Jane Addams Honor Award.

Jul 252024
 

Flag of Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico celebrates Constitution Day. Also called Commonwealth Day, the day celebrates the island’s 1952 constitution adoption. A United States territory, this Caribbean island is a bit less than three times the size of Rhode Island. Although it has a tropical climate, the country often experiences droughts and hurricanes. About 3.7 million people live in Puerto Rico, and many of the inhabitants have jobs related to dairy farming, sugar production, or tourism. More than 3.6 million tourists visit Puerto Rico each year. San Juan is the capital. Children could learn more at: Puerto Rico.

Jul 252024
 
Louis Bleriot before take-off

Louis Bleriot before take-off

Louis Bleriot became the first person to fly a plane across the English Channel. He left Les Baraques, France, in 1909 and landed in Dover, England. The trip took 36 minutes 30 seconds. The Daily Mail, a British newspaper, had offered a reward of £1000 to the first successful aviator. Bleriot received the reward, and he instantly became famous. Children could read the 1984 Caldecott Medal book The Glorious Flight: Across the Channel with Louis Bleriot, July 25, 1909 by Alice Provensen and Martin Provensen.

Jul 252024
 

Thomas Eakins (born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1844; died Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 25, 1916) was a painter and sculptor. His works were extremely realistic. Children could visit a website at: Thomas Eakins.

Rosalind Franklin (born United Kingdom, 1920; died United Kingdom, April 16, 1958) was a scientist who specialized in studying the molecular structure of RNA and DNA. Her work was used by Watson and Crick to figure out the helix structure of DNA. Children could learn more at: Rosalind Franklin.

Anna Harrison

Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison (born Morristown, New Jersey, 1775; died North Bend, Ohio, February 25, 1864) was the wife of William Henry Harrison, the ninth President of the United States. She never lived in the White House. She was too ill to be at his inauguration, and he contracted pneumonia at his swearing in ceremony. He died within a month of his inauguration. She outlived her husband by 23 years. She was also the grandmother of Benjamin Harrison, 23rd President of the United States. Children could visit a website at: Anna Harrison.

Henry Knox (born Boston, Massachusetts, 1750; died Thomaston, Maine, October 25, 1806) was a general during the Revolutionary War. Knox was responsible for Washington’s troops crossing the Delaware in 1776. Before the war he was a bookseller. After the war, Washington appointed Knox to be secretary of war. Fort Knox was named in honor of him. Children can experience a great timeline at: Henry Knox.

Ruth Krauss (born Baltimore, Maryland, 1901; died Westport, Connecticut, July 10, 1993) wrote at least 40 books for children. Her books include A Hole Is to Dig and A Very Special House. Illustrators of her books include Marc Simont, Remy Charlip, and Maurice Sendak.

Rachel Vail (born New York, New York, 1966) has written at least 43 books for children and young adults. Her works include The Friendship Ring series and the Mama Rex and T series. Children can visit her website at: Rachel Vail.

Clyde Watson (born New York, New York, 1947) has written at least twenty works for children. She often collaborates with her sister, Wendy Watson. Her books include Catch Me Kiss Me and Applebet: An ABC. Children can visit her website at: Clyde Watson.

Jul 262024
 

Liberia celebrates Independence Day. In 1816 freed slaves settled in a town in Africa later named Monrovia. The colony grew and became the first republic in Africa in 1847. The country is about the size of Tennessee, and it has a tropical climate. Agricultural products include coffee, cocoa, bananas, and rice. Almost four million people live there, and most of the major cities are along the Atlantic coast. Monrovia remains the capital. Children can learn more at: Liberia.

Jul 262024
 

Flag of Maldives

Maldives celebrate Independence Day. Great Britain gave up control of the coral islands in 1965. About 1,200 islands make up this country located in the Indian Ocean. In total the area of the islands is about 1.7 times the area of the Washington, DC. Almost 400,000 people live there, and many derive their income from the tourist industry. Male is the capital. Children could learn more at: Maldives.