Apr 242019
 

Hubble Space Telescope

Hubble Space Telescope was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery in 1990. Unfortunately the lenses were not working properly until a shuttle team could repair it in 1993. It was modified again in 1997 and once more in 2009. Because the telescope is beyond earth’s atmosphere, it can detect images seven to ten times better than any earth scope. The size of a school bus, the telescope continues to send back amazing images of our universe. Children can watch a video at: Hubble. They can also learn more at: http://hubblesite.org/gallery/.

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Apr 242019
 

Edmund Cartwight (born Nottinghamshire, England, 1743; died Hastings, Sussex, England, October 30, 1823) was an inventor and a cleric. He created the power loom for weaving. Idea: Children could weave on a simple loom. They could then appreciate how the power loom made the production of textiles more efficient.

Evaline Ness (born Union City, Ohio, 1911; died New York, New York, August 12, 1986) wrote and/or illustrated more than 30 books for children. She received three Caldecott Honor Awards: in 1964 for All in the Morning Early, in 1965 for A Pocketful of Cricket, and in 1966 for Tom Tit Tot. Her book Sam, Bangs, & Moonshine won the 1967 Caldecott Award. Children could learn more at: Evaline Ness.

Robert Penn Warren (born Guthrie, Kentucky, 1905; died Stratton, Vermont, September 15, 1989) was an American writer. He won the 1947 Pulitzer Prize for All the King’s Men.

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Apr 252019
 

Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day is today. The day is always the fourth Thursday in April.

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Apr 252019
 

Martin Waldseemuller

Martin Waldseemuller Remembrance Day is today. Martin Waldseemuller (born probably in Radolfzell, Germany, c. 1470; died probably St. Die, France, c. 1520) was an early cartographer. He gave the continents of North America and South America their names. He named them after Amerigo Vespucci, the person he thought had first discovered the land masses. Idea: Students could speculate as to what Waldseemuller would have named the continents had he known Christopher Columbus explored the area first. Children can view a copy of his extremely rare world map, purchased by the Library of Congress, at: http://www.loc.gov/rr/geogmap/waldexh.html.

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Apr 252019
 

Spanish-American War began in 1898. At that time Spain ruled Cuba, and many Americans had heard that the conditions on the island were intolerable. The United States sent the battleship Maine to protect Americans living there. In February the ship exploded, and 260 people on board died. “Remember the Maine” became a popular expression. War was declared, and battles occurred not only in and around Cuba but around the Philippines as well. Teddy Roosevelt became famous as one of the leaders of the Rough Riders. The war ended on August 12, 1898. Children could learn more at: Spanish-American War.

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Apr 252019
 

Suez CanalSuez Canal began construction in 1859. The 120-mile canal connecting the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea began operations November 17, 1869. The canal has no locks because the two seas are fairly level. Children can find interesting facts and great photographs at: Suez Canal.

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Apr 252019
 

Saint Lawrence Seaway began operating in 1959. Construction began in September, 1954. Over 6000 people had to be relocated because a reservoir would cover their land. Canada and the United States each operate a portion of the 450-mile seaway. It connects Lake Erie to Montreal to the Atlantic Ocean. Children could read Gail Gibbons’s The Great St. Lawrence Seaway. Children could also visit: Seaway. They could study the Suez Canal and the St. Lawrence Seaway in more detail. How are the two alike? How are they different?

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Apr 252019
 

Solar powered battery was first demonstrated in 1954. Scientists of Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey, used solar powered batteries to activate a toy Ferris Wheel and a radio transmitter. Children can view a video about today’s solar energy at: Solar Battery.

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Apr 252019
 

William Brennan

William Brennan (born Newark, New Jersey, 1906; died Virginia, July 25, 1997) was an associate justice for the Supreme Court.

Ella Fitzgerald (born Newport News, Virginia, 1918; died Beverly Hills, California, June 15, 1996) was a renowned jazz singer.

Maud Hart Lovelace (born Mankato, Minnesota, 1892; died Claremont, California, March 11, 1980) wrote books for children. She is best known for her Betsy-Tacy series. Older children could learn more at: http://www.betsy-tacysociety.org/.

George Ella Lyon (born Harlan, Kentucky, 1949) writes books for children and young adults. Her books include Holding on to Zoe and Weaving the Rainbow. Her website is: http://www.georgeellalyon.com/.

Guglielmo Marconi

Guglielmo Marconi (born Bologna, Italy, 1874; died Rome, Italy, July 20, 1937) invented the wireless telegraph. He won the 1909 Nobel Prize in physics for his invention.

Alvin Schwartz (born Brooklyn, New York, 1927; died Princeton, New Jersey, March 14, 1992) wrote at least 27 books, particularly folklore, for children. He is most known for his Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark series.

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Apr 262019
 
Soft Pretzels

Soft Pretzels

National Pretzel Day is today! In 2003 then Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell proclaimed March 26 to be National Pretzel Day because the snack is an important source of revenue to the state. According to one source, Philadelphians eat twelve times the national average for pretzels!

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