Nov 272021
 

Williamsburg, Virginia, began restoration processes in 1926. Colonial Williamsburg, along with Jamestown and Yorktown, form the Historic Triangle. About four million people visit the region each year. Colonial Williamsburg has a great website for children at: Williamsburg.

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Nov 272021
 

Anders Celsius (born Uppsala, Sweden, 1701; died Uppsala, Sweden, April 25, 1744) was an astronomer. However, he is most famous for his Celsius temperature scale. In the Celsius (centigrade) Scale, water freezes at zero degres, and water boils at one hundred degrees. Children could compare and contrast the Fahrenheit Scale with the Celsius Scale. They could also research where these scales are used.

Kevin Henkes (born Racine, Wisconsin, 1960) is a children’s author and illustrator. One of his books is Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse. His Circle Dogs received the 1999 Charlotte Zolotow Award: Highly Commended. Henkes received a 2004 Caldecott Honor Award for Owen. Kitten’s First Full Moon was awarded the 2005 Caldecott Medal, and Olive’s Ocean received the 2004 Newbery Honor Award. He earned a 2014 Newbery Honor Award for The Year of Billy Miller. He received a 2016 Caldecott Honor Award for Waiting. His amazing website is absolutely loaded with activities: Kevin Henkes.

Robert R. Livingston

Robert R. Livingston (born New York, New York, 1746; died Clermont, New York, February 26, 1813) was a patriot, a member of the Continental Congress, and a diplomat. Representing New York, he was one of the Committee of Five, the representatives who drafted the Declaration of Independence. A fervent believer in independence, he was recalled to New York and did not sign the Declaration. He delivered the presidential oath to George Washington at the inauguration in 1789. He was Minister to France from 1801 to 1804 and therefore he negotiated the Louisiana Purchase.

The Egg TreeKatherine Milhous (born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1894; died Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 5, 1977) was a writer and an illustrator. She wrote and/or illustrated over 15 books. One of her books, The Egg Tree, received the 1951 Caldecott Medal.

Bill Nye (born Washington, DC, 1955) is an educator, writer, scientist, and TV personality. He hosted “Bill Nye the Science Guy” on television from 1993 to 1998. He continues to be active in the combined fields of science and education. Children could spend days at his amazing website: Bill Nye.

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Nov 282021
 

Tonight is the first night of Hanukkah, the eight-day “Festival of Lights” that commemorates the success of the Maccabees when they fought the Seleucids 2100 years ago. When the Maccabees knew they were victorious, they realized they had enough oil to light the menorah for only one night. However, the oil lasted for eight nights. Jews eat latkes, play games with dreidels, and light candles on the menorah every night. Tonight the shamash (the middle candle) and one more candle will be lit. Hanukkah will end the night of December 30. Children could read Alexandra’s Scroll: The Story of the First Hanukkah, written by Miriam Chaikin. Children could also visit a great website, loaded with activities, at: http://www.activityvillage.co.uk/hanukkah_for_kids.htm.

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Nov 282021
 

Albania celebrates Liberation Day. The Ottoman Empire gave up control of Albania in 1912. Located in southeastern Europe, the country is a bit smaller than the state of Maryland (according to the CIA World Factbook). Almost three million people live in this mountainous and hilly country. Tirana is the capital. Albania’s major industries are food processing and textiles. Older children can learn more at: Albania.

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Nov 282021
 

Mauritania celebrates Independence Day. It gained its freedom from France in 1960. The country, located in northwestern Africa, is larger than the state of Texas. Over three million people live in Mauritania, and the capital is Nouakchott. Located in the Sahara Desert, the country derives most of its income from livestock, iron ore, and gypsum. Older children could learn more at: Mauritania.

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Nov 282021
 
Duryea and His Auto

Duryea and His Motorized Wagon

First automobile race in the United States took place in 1895. This is an interesting story. Cars had been invented only two year earlier. The Chicago Times-Herald wanted to promote cars and boost newspaper circulation, so the newspaper sponsored the race. Approximately 83 cars were entered, but only six cars participated in the 54-mile race from Chicago to Evanston and back. The cars and drivers had to battle cold weather, snow, and local laws to finish. The winner, Charles Duryea in his motorized wagon, averaged seven miles per hour. He won $5000 (over $100,000 in today’s money). Children could learn more at: First Automobile Race.

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Nov 282021
 
Lady Astor

Lady Astor

Lady Astor became the first woman to be elected to the British Parliament. Born in the United States, Lady Astor was elected in 1919. She served until 1945. Children could find out if British Parliament elections differ from American elections by watching: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qs-9B3FRXCA.

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Nov 282021
 

Stephanie Calmenson (born Brooklyn, New York, 1952) writes books for children. Her works include The Principal’s New Clothes and Dinner at the Panda Palace. Children can learn more at: Stephanie Calmenson.

Ed Young (born Tientsin, China, 1931) is a children’s author and illustrator. He has written/illustrated 17 books and illustrated more than 60 other books. He wrote among other works Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding-Hood Story from China (Caldecott Medal), published in 1989. Two other books, the Emperor and the Kite (1967) and Seven Blind Mice (1992), were Caldecott Honor Books. In 1992 and 2000 he was the United States nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal. His website has a very interesting home page: Ed Young.

Tomi Ungerer (born Strasbourg, France, 1931; died Cork, Ireland, February 9, 2019) published over 140 children’s books. His books have been translated into many different languages. He illustrated Jeff Brown’s Flat Stanley in 1964. Children can visit Ungerer’s website at: Tomi Ungerer.

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Nov 292021
 

Admiral Byrd

Admiral Richard E. Byrd and three colleagues made the first ever flight over the South Pole in 1929. They traveled 1560 miles in over 18 hours. They had to dump empty gas tanks and emergency supplies to achieve necessary altitude. They mapped new mountain ranges and collected meteorological and geologic information.

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Nov 292021
 

Enos in 1961 became the first US chimpanzee to survive orbital flight. He was part of Mercury Atlas 5, which orbited twice around the world before it splashed into the ocean near Puerto Rico. The flight was a precursor to one where John Glenn orbited the earth. Children can read about animals in the space program at: Space Animals.

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