Aug 152022
 
Liechtenstein Flag

Flag of Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein celebrates Assumption Day, a national holiday. This tiny principality, about the size of Washington, DC, is located between Austria and Switzerland. About 37,000 people live in this country of a low valley surrounded by mountains. Vaduz is the capital. Interesting fact: Liechtenstein is one of two doubly landlocked countries. Uzbekistan is the other country. Older children can learn more at: Liechtenstein.

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Aug 152022
 
South Korea Flag

Flag of South Korea

South Korea celebrates Liberation Day. In 1945 it became free of Japanese rule. Its area is slightly larger than the area of Indiana, and mountains and hills cover the northwestern portion while a coastal plain covers the southeastern portion. Almost 49 million people live there, and Seoul is the capital. Children could learn more at: South Korea.

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Aug 152022
 
Republic of Congo Flag

Flag of Republic of the Congo

Republic of the Congo celebrates Independence Day. It became free from French control in 1960. Located on the western coast of Africa, this country, about the size of the state of Montana, exports sugarcane, coffee and many other products. About 4.5 million people live in the Republic of the Congo, and Brazzaville is the capital. Older children can learn more at: Republic of the Congo.

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Aug 152022
 
Kissing the War Goodbye

Kissing the War Goodbye

World War II informally ended in 1945. When President Truman proclaimed that the Japanese had surrendered, people rejoiced around the world. The official surrender took place on September 2, 1945, in Tokyo Bay aboard the USS Missouri. Idea: Children could read 500 Facts World War II History for Kids, written by Kelly Milner Halls and illustrated by Katy Dockrill. Then they could make a timeline of World War II.

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Aug 152022
 
Napoleon Bonaparte

Napoleon Bonaparte

Napoleon Bonaparte (born Corsica, 1769; died St. Helena, May 5, 1821) was a French emperor.

Stephen G. Breyer (born San Francisco, California, 1938) is a retired associate justice of the Supreme Court. Appointed by Bill Clinton, he took over his duties regarding the Supreme Court on August 3, 1994. He retired on June 30, 2022. Children could learn more at: Stephen G. Breyer.

Walter Crane (born United Kingdom, 1845; died United Kingdom, March 14, 1915) was a famous illustrator of children’s books. He, Randolph Caldecott, and Kate Greenaway formed a powerful triumvirate that invigorated children’s literature. Children can view many of his works at: Project Gutenberg. They could learn more about Crane at: Walter Crane.

Edna Ferber (born Kalamazoo, Michigan, 1887; died New York, New York, April 16, 1968) was a novelist. So Big was very popular, and it won her a Pulitzer Prize. Children can read some of her works at: Project Gutenberg.

Florence Kling Harding

Florence Kling Harding

Florence Kling Harding (born Marion, Ohio, 1860; died Marion, Ohio, November 21, 1924) was the wife of Warren Harding, twenty-ninth president of the United States. Children can visit a website at: Florence Kling Harding. Idea: One child could research Mrs. Harding’s life and pretend to be her. The rest could have a question and answer session with “Mrs. Harding.”

Theresa Nelson (born Beaumont, Texas, 1948) writes books for children. Her works include Earthshine and The Empress of Elsewhere. Children can visit her website at: Theresa Nelson.

Edith Nesbit (born Kennington, Surrey, England, 1858; died New Romney, Kent, England, May 4, 1924) wrote at least 40 books for both children and adults. Her most famous children’s books include The Railway Children and Five Children and It. Children can learn more at: Edith Nesbit.

Sir Walter Scott (born Edinburgh, Scotland, 1771; died Abbotsford, Scotland, September 21, 1832) was a famous poet. Children can read many of his works at: Project Gutenberg.

Brinton Turkle (born Alliance, Ohio, 1915; died Santa Fe, New Mexico, 2003) wrote and illustrated books for children. His works include Do Not Open and Deep in the Forest. He received a 1970 Caldecott Honor Award for Thy Friend, Obadiah. Children could learn more at: Brinton Turkle.

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Aug 162022
 

Battle of Bennington Day is celebrated in Vermont. The Green Mountain Boys defeated the British in 1777. During the Revolutionary War, British General Burgoyne sent a large contingent into the town of Bennington to to take much-needed supplies and horses.  The British were surprised to find 2,000 patriots, led by General John Stark. Burgoyne lost about 1,000 soldiers and was never able to replace his supplies. Eventually Burgoyne had to surrender at the Battle of Saratoga. Children can learn more at: Battle of Bennington.

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Aug 162022
 
Klondike Gold Rush

Klondike Gold Rush

Bonanza Creek, Alaska, experienced a gold rush in 1896. When Skookum Jim, Dawson Charlie and others discovered gold in Rabbit Creek, the Klondike Gold Rush began. Around 100,000 people tried to travel to the area, but only about 30,000 actually completed the trip. Of that number only 4,000 prospectors found gold. In 1903 production started to decline, and about 1,250,000 pounds of gold were mined in the area. Idea: Children could read about the Klondike Gold Rush. What problems did the prospectors face? Children could learn more at the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park at: http://www.nps.gov/klgo/index.htm.

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Aug 162022
 

Sports Illustrated appeared for the first time in 1954. Currently three million people subscribe to the magazine, and 23 million people read the weekly magazine.

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Aug 162022
 

Menachem Begin (born Brest-Litovsk, Poland, 1913; died Tel Aviv, Israel, March 9, 1992) was an important Israeli hero. He fought for Israel’s freedom. He was elected Israel’s Prime Minister in 1977 and signed the Camp David Accord in 1979. He and Anwar el-Sadat received the 1978 Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts.

Matt Christopher (born Bath, Pennsylvania, 1917; died Charlotte, North Carolina, September 20, 1997) was a children’s author. He is known for his 130 novels about sports. Children could visit a site hosted by his sons, Dale and Duane, at: Matt Christopher. Idea: Children could pick one of Matt Christopher’s sports books. After reading it, they could make a list of new things they have learned about the sport.

Beatrice Schenk de Regniers (born Lafayette, Indiana, 1914; died Washington, DC, March 1, 2000) wrote more than 50 books for children. Her works include May I Bring a Friend? (which earned a Caldecott Medal for illustrator Beni Montresor) and The Giant Story (illustrated by Maurice Sendak). Children can learn more at: Beatrice Schenk de Regniers.

Diana Wynne Jones (born United Kingdom, 1934; died United Kingdom, March 26, 2011) wrote fantasy books for children. Her works include Fire and Hemlock and The Archer’s Goon. Children could learn more at: Diana Wynne Jones.

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Aug 172022
 
Indonesia Flag

Flag of Indonesia

Indonesia celebrates Independence Day. It became free from Dutch control in 1945. About 13,700 islands comprise this archipelago, located between Asia and Australia. The total area of the islands is about three times the size of Texas. Over 251 million people live in Indonesia, making it the fourth most populous country. Jakarta is the capital. Idea: Indonesia grows cassava. Children could find out more about this crop. Older children could learn more about the country at: Indonesia.

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