Apr 052023
 

matzah

Passover begins at sundown tonight and ends at sundown on April 13. Passover (Pesach) celebrates the freedom of Jews from Egyptian slavery. During Passover, Jews cannot eat any leavened bread, but they can eat unleavened bread called matzah. Children could read the chapter about Passover from Celebrate! Stories of the Jewish Holidays, written by Gilda Berger and illustrated by Peter Catalanotto.

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Apr 052023
 

National Peeps Day is today. Peeps were introduced in 1953 when a company Just Born, owned by Ukrainian immigrant Sam Born, acquired a small candy company and then figured out how to mass produce the marshmallow treats. Originally created for Easter, Peeps now celebrate Halloween, Christmas, and Valentine’s Day.

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Apr 052023
 

National Walking Day is today. Scheduled for the first Wednesday in April, the day reminds us of the benefits of walking. About 30 minutes of brisk walking benefits both bodies and minds.

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Apr 052023
 

PocahantasPocahontas married John Rolfe in 1614. She and her husband sailed to England in 1616 where she was extremely popular. She died of smallpox in England in 1617. Children could learn more at: Pocahontas.

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Apr 052023
 
Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park

National Park Service was created in 1916. Today the service manages 424 national parks, national monuments, or national historic sites. According to the National Park Service, 312 million people visited the national parks in 2022. Children can learn more at: National Park Service. The website states that 49 states have some form of national park service site. Which state does not have a national park, national monument, or national historic site?

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Apr 052023
 

Fort Raleigh National Historic Site was established in 1941. Located in Dare County, North Carolina, the site protects Roanoke Colony, the first English settlement in North America. The settlers, funded by Sir Walter Raleigh, arrived in 1587. However, by 1590 no settlers could be found. The area became the “Lost Colony.” Children could learn more at: https://www.nps.gov/fora/index.htm.

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Apr 052023
 

Kareem Abdul-Jabar became the highest scorer in the NBA in 1984. Born Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr., he scored 38,387 points in 1,560 games over twenty years. Children could create math problems regarding his basketball statistics. For example, they could find out his average number of points scored per game.

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Apr 052023
 

Benjamin Harrison V (born Virginia, 1726; died Virginia, April 24, 1791) signed the Declaration of Independence. He represented Virginia and was active in both the First Continental Congress and the Second Continental Congress. After the Revolutionary War, he was the fifth governor of Virginia. His son, William Henry Harrison, was elected the ninth President, but he died of pneumonia a month after taking office. William Henry Harrison’s grandson, Benjamin Harrison, was the 23rd President of the United States. Children could learn more at: Benjamin Harrison V.

Anthony Horowitz (born England, 1955) has written over 35 books for children. He also creates British television series, such as Foyle’s War. His books include the Alex Rider series, the Power of Five series, and the Diamond Brothers series. Children can learn more at: Anthony Horowitz.

Joseph Lister (born Upton, Essex, England, 1827; died Walmer, England, February 10, 1912) was the forefather of antiseptic surgery.

Colin Powell (born Harlem, New York, 1937; died Bethesda, Maryland, October 18, 2021) was a former Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff of the Armed Forces of the United States. He was active in politics, and he was the first African American to be United States Secretary of State. Older children could read more at: Colin Powell.

Judith A. Resnik (born Akron, Ohio, 1949; died January 28, 1986) in 1984 became the second American woman to go into space. She died in the Challenger implosion. Children could learn more at: Judith Resnik.

Frank Stockton (born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1834; died Washington, DC, April 20, 1902) wrote books for children. His works include The Bee-Man of Or and Other Fanciful Tales. He is perhaps best known for his story “The Lady, or the Tiger?” Children can read many of his works at: Project Gutenberg. They can learn more at: Frank Stockton.

Booker Taliaferro Washington (born a slave in Franklin County, Virginia, 1856; died Tuskegee, Alabama, November 14, 1915) was an African American leader and educator. He founded the Tuskegee Institute, and he influenced presidents, governors, and members of Congress. Children can read a biography, Fifty Cents and a Dream: Young Booker T. Washington, by Jabari Asim. They can also read Washington’s book Up from Slavery at: Project Gutenberg.

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