Oct 182020
 

James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins shared the 1962 Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology for theorizing the double-helix structure of DNA.

Share Button
Oct 182020
 

First All-Woman Space Walk happened in 2019. Ms. Christina Koch and Dr. Jessica Meir conducted a seven-hour 19-minute walk outside the International Space Station and replaced a broken power controller. The first such walk was supposed to happen in March 2019, until project managers realized the International Space Station did not have two suits suitable for women. Children can learn more at: All-Woman Space Walk.

Share Button
Oct 182020
 

James Brooks (born St. Louis, Missouri, 1906; died Brookhaven, New York, March 8, 1992) was an artist. He began his artistic career painting murals for the Federal Art Project of the Works Progress Administration. Later his works became more abstract.

Joyce Hansen (born New York, New York, 1942) writes books for children. She has received four Coretta Scott King Honor Awards: in 1987 for Which Way Freedom, in 1995 for The Captive, in 1998 for I Thought My Soul Would Rise and Fly: The Diary of Patsy, a Freed Girl, and in 1999 (with Gary McGowen) for Breaking Ground, Breaking Silence: The Story of New York’s African Burial Ground. Children can visit her website at: Joyce Hansen.

Ntozake Shange (born Trenton, New Jersey, 1948; died Bowie, Maryland, October 27, 2018) was a playwright, a poet, and an author. She wrote several books for children, including Ellington Was Not a Street and Coretta Scott.

Colin Thompson (born London, England, 1942) writes and illustrates fantasy books for children. His works include The Floods series and Looking for Atlantis. Children can visit his very interesting website, including some great illustrations, at: Colin Thompson.

Share Button
Oct 192020
 

Ferdinand II of Aragon married Isabella I of Castile in 1469. Their alliance united Aragon and Castile, starting the formation of Spain.

Share Button
Oct 192020
 
Cornwallis Surrenders

Cornwallis Surrenders

Yorktown Day marks the surrender of General Lord Cornwallis and his troops to George Washington in 1781. This surrender virtually ended the Revolutionary War. No other major battles occurred after this date, and the official peace agreement, the Treaty of Paris, was signed September 3, 1783. Children can learn more at: Yorktown Day.

Share Button
Oct 192020
 

Ed Emberley (born Malden, Massachusetts, 1931) is a children’s author and illustrator. He received the 1968 Caldecott Medal for his illustrations of Drummer Hoff.  He is also known for his books about drawing, including his Thumbprint series. Idea: Children could make some thumbprint pictures after looking at his books. They could also visit his very interesting website at: Ed Emberley.

Dan Gutman (born New York, New York, 1955) writes books for children. His works include The Homework Machine and Honus and Me. Children can visit his website at: Dan Gutman.

Annie Smith Peck (born Providence, Rhode Island, 1850; died New York, New York, July 18, 1935) was a famous mountain climber. In 1895 she scaled the Matterhorn. Later she climbed the Peruvian mountain Huascaran, setting a record for the highest peak ever climbed by man or woman in the western hemisphere. When she was 61, she climbed Mt. Coropuna in Peru. At the top of the 21,250 feet summit, she planted a banner stating “Votes for Women.” Idea: Children could find out when women did get the right to vote.

Philip Pullman (born Norwich, England, 1946) is a children’s author. He wrote The Golden Compass, The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass. He received the very prestigious Astrid Lindgren Award in 2005. He was knighted in 2019. Children could visit his website at: Philip Pullman.

Martha Wayles Skelton Jefferson (born Charles City County, Virginia, 1748; died Monticello, Virginia, September 6, 1782) was the wife of Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States. She died before Jefferson was elected president. They had six children, but only two lived to adulthood. These two daughters often filled the role of hostess at the White House. Children could visit a website at: Martha Jefferson.

Share Button
Oct 202020
 
Changes from Treaty of 1818

Changes from Treaty of 1818

Treaty of 1818 was signed by the United States and the United Kingdom. Among other decisions, the treaty stated that the 49th Parallel would define most of the border between Canada and the United States. Older children can peruse the treaty at: Treaty of 1818.

Share Button
Oct 202020
 

Sydney Opera House opened in Sydney, Australia, in 1973. Despite its name, it hosts many types of artistic endeavors. About 1,500 concerts occur yearly, and over 1.2 million visitors enter its doors every year.

Share Button
Oct 202020
 

BepiColombo was launched in 2018. The European Space Agency and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency worked together to launch the space explorer. BepiColombo will travel for seven years to reach Mercury during December 2025. It will release two probes, Bepi and Mio, to research the land formation and magnetic field of the planet.

Share Button
Oct 202020
 

John Dewey (born Burlington, Vermont, 1859; died New York, New York, June 2, 1952) was an educator and a philosopher.

John R. Erickson (born Midland, Texas, 1942) is a cowboy and author. He has written about 70 books, and he is best-known for his Hank the Cowdog series. Children can visit his very interesting website: Hank the Dog.

Nikki Grimes (born New York, New York, 1950) writes books for children. She received a 1999 Coretta Scott King Honor Award for Jazmin’s Notebook and another Coretta Scott King Honor Award in 2003 for Talkin’ About Bessie: The Story of Aviator Elizabeth Coleman. Her book Bronx Masquerade received the 2003 Coretta Scott King Medal. Children can visit her website at: Nikki Grimes.

Crockett Johnson

Harold and the Purple Crayon

Crockett Johnson (born David Liesk in New York, New York, 1906; died Norwalk, Connecticut, July 11, 1975) was a children’s author and illustrator. His works include the Barnaby series and  Harold and the Purple Crayon. Older children (and adults) could enjoy his many fascinating paintings about interesting math concepts at: Crockett Johnson.

Mickey Mantle (born Spavinaw, Oklahoma, 1931; died Dallas, Texas, August 13, 1995) was a baseball player. From 1951 through 1968, he played for the New York Yankees. He hit 536 homeruns in regular play. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974.

Christopher Wren (born East Knoyle, Wiltshire, England, 1632; died London, England, February 25, 1723) was an architect, astronomer and mathematician. He designed St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. According to his son, Wren created over 50 inventions and theories.

Share Button