Aug 302019
 

Lake Pontchartrain Causeway opened in 1956. The 23.86 mile long bridge connects Metairie, Louisiana, and Mandeville, Louisiana. Until 2011 the structure was deemed the longest bridge over water in the world.

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Aug 302019
 
Hotline during Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidency

Hotline during Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidency

Direct telephone communication, nicknamed the Hotline, was completed between the White House and the Kremlin in 1963. Legend called the Hotline a red telephone, but it was neither red nor a telephone. At first a teletype machine was used; then Reagan implemented a fax machine. Presently the Hotline is a secure computer link.

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Aug 302019
 

Ellen Arthur

Ellen Lewis Herndon Arthur (born Culpeper, Virginia, 1837; died New York, New York, January 11, 1880) was the wife of Chester A. Arthur, twenty-first president of the United States. She was the daughter of William Lewis Herndon, an explorer of the Amazon River. She died before Arthur was ever elected president. Children could visit a website at: Ellen Lewis Herndon Arthur.

Virginia Lee Burton (born Newton Centre, Massachusetts, 1909; died Boston, Massachusetts, October 15, 1968) was a children’s book illustrator. She won the 1943 Caldecott Medal for The Little House. She also wrote and illustrated Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel. Children could learn more at: Virginia Lee Burton.

Donald Crews (born Newark, New Jersey, 1938) is a picture book author and illustrator. He has received two Caldecott Honor Awards: in 1979 for Freight Train and in 1981 for Truck. He received the 2015 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for his body of works. Children can learn more at: Donald Crews.

Laurent de Brunhoff (born Paris, France, 1925) writes and illustrates books for children. His father, Jean de Brunhoff, created the Babar series. Laurent continued to write 45 more Babar books after his father died. He has also written other types of books for children.

Millicent Selsam (born New York, New York, 1912; died New York, New York, October 12, 1996) wrote over 100 books for children. Her books include Greg’s Microscope and Egg to Chick. Children can learn more at: Millicent Selsam.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (born London, England, 1797; died London, England, February 1, 1851) was an author. One of her most famous works is Frankenstein. She was married to poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, and she edited much of her husband’s work after he died. Children can read Frankenstein and many of her other works at: Project Gutenberg.

Roy Wilkins (born St. Louis, Missouri, 1901; died New York, New York, September 8, 1981), the grandson of a slave, was a civil rights leader. He was a driving force in the NAACP.

Ted Williams (born San Diego, California, 1918; died Inverness, Florida, July 5, 2002) was a famous baseball player. He was a veteran of both World War II and the Korean War. An outfielder, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966.

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