Aug 072019
 
Cote d'Ivoire

Flag of Cote D’Ivoire

Cote D’Ivoire celebrates Independence Day. The west African country gained its independence in 1960 from France. Bordering the Atlantic Ocean, Cote D’Ivoire has an area about the same as the area of New Mexico. The mostly flat country has a tropical climate along the coast. The country exports cocoa beans and coffee beans. Over 22 million people live there, and Yamoussoukro is the capital.

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Aug 072019
 

Purple Heart was created by General George Washington in 1782 to be the Badge of Military Merit. Experts believe only three medals were awarded during the Revolutionary War. The badge was made of purple cloth with silver braided trim.

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Aug 072019
 

United States War Department was created in 1789 by Congress. In 1949 it was renamed the Department of Defense. Children could visit the department’s website at: http://www.defense.gov/.

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Aug 072019
 
Alice Huyler Ramsey

Alice Huyler Ramsey

Alice Huyler Ramsey and three fellow female travelers in 1909 became the first women to drive across the country by automobile. They left Manhattan on June 9, 1909, and finished in San Francisco, California. Only Ramsey could drive! She had to replace flat tires, fix brake pedals, and make other repairs. Only 152 miles of the 3,600 mile trip were paved. Older children could learn more at: Alice Huyler Ramsey.

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Aug 072019
 
Explorer VI

Explorer VI

Explorer VI was launched in 1959 and transmitted the first photographs of earth taken from space. The satellite also transmitted data about different types of energy. The satellite went into decay on July 1, 1961.

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Aug 072019
 

Ralph Johnson Bunche (born Detroit, Michigan, 1904; died New York, New York, December 9, 1971) was a diplomat and United Nations representative. The grandson of a former slave, he joined the United Nations in 1947. He became an undersecretary in 1955, and he received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for his work with Arabs and Jews. Children could read Ralph J. Bunch: Peacemaker by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack.

Betsy Byars (born Charlotte, North Carolina, 1928) has written over 60 books for children. She wrote among other works Cracker Jackson, 1985. Her book Summer of the Swans received the 1971 Newbery Medal, and Wanted…Mud Blossom earned the 1962 Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Literature. Children can learn more, especially about her unique house, at: Betsy Byars.

Nathanael Greene

Nathanael Greene

Nathanael Greene (born Patowomut, Rhode Island, 1742; died Savannah, Georgia, June 19, 1786) was a general during the Revolutionary War. Children could learn more at: Nathanael Greene.

Rudolf C. Ising (born Kansas City, Missouri, 1903; died Newport Beach, California, July 18, 1992) created, along with Hugh Harmon, Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies. He won an Academy Award for Milky Way, a cartoon about three kittens, in 1948. Idea: Children could make flip books.

Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey (born Kabete, Kenya, 1903; died London, United Kingdom, October 1, 1972) was an anthropologist. He and his wife Mary devoted their lives to finding out more about early human life in eastern Africa.

Coleen Salley (born Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1929; died September 16, 2008) wrote books for children. She published her first book when she was 72 years old! Her works include the Epossumondas series and Who’s That Tripping Over My Bridge? Children can visit a website devoted to her at: Coleen Salley.

Maia Wojciechowska (born Warsaw, Poland, 1927; died Long Branch, New Jersey, June 13, 2002) wrote books for children. She wrote Shadow of a Bull, the 1965 Newbery Medal winner. Children could learn more at: Maia Wojciechowska.

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