Dec 282018
 

Iowa State Flag

Iowa became the twenty-ninth state of the United States in 1846. It was named after the Iowa Indian tribe. The area was originally part of the Louisiana Purchase. In 1838 it, along with parts of Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota, was part of the Iowa Territory. Des Moines is the state capital, and its nickname is the Hawkeye State. It is still a leading producer of corn, cattle, and hogs. Children can visit an Internet site at: Iowa. Idea: Iowa has only four letters in its name. It and two other states have the shortest names. Children could arrange the states’ names according to how many letters are in each name. Which state has the longest name?

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Dec 282018
 
Ben Franklin

Ben Franklin

Benjamin Franklin published Poor Richard’s Almanack for the first time in 1732. He wrote under the pseudonym Richard Saunders and published the almanac yearly through 1758. Here he penned some of his most famous lines, including, “A penny saved is a penny earned.” Children could read, write, and illustrate some of his sayings after they have visited: http://www.poorrichards.net/.

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Dec 282018
 

Chewing gum was patented in 1869 by W. F. Semple, a dentist from Mount Vernon, Ohio. Today worldwide consumers spend 19 billion dollars a year on gum. The average person chews 300 sticks of gum each year. Children can see Semple’s descriptive patent at: Gum Patent and they can research how gum is made at: Gum Production.

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Dec 282018
 
Bald Eagle

Photo of Bald Eagle, courtesy of Saffron Blaze

Endangered Species Act became a law when it was signed by President Richard Nixon in 1973. The law tries to protect species that could become extinct. The law has helped the bald eagle, the whooping crane, and other species. Children can learn more at: Scholastic.

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Dec 282018
 

Carol Ryrie Brink (born Moscow, Idaho, 1895; died La Jolla, California, August 15, 1981) was an author of more than 30 books. One of her books is Caddie Woodlawn. It received the 1936 Newbery Award. Children could visit a website at: Carol Ryrie Brink.

Cynthia DeFelice (born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1951) has written sixteen novels and twelve picture books. Her books include The Real, True Dulcie Campbell and When Grandpa Kissed His Elbow. Children can visit her website at: Cynthia DeFelice.

Elizabeth F. Howard (born Baltimore, Maryland, 1927) has written at least twelve books for children. One of her books, Virgie Goes to School with Us Boys, was illustrated by E. B. Lewis. He received a 2001 Coretta Scott King Honor Award for the book’s illustrations.

Emily Cheney Neville (born Manchester, Connecticut, 1919; died December 14, 1997) wrote books for children. Her first book, It’s Like This, Cat, received the 1964 Newbery Medal.

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson (born Staunton, Virginia, 1856; died Washington, DC, February 3, 1924) was the twenty-eighth president (1913-1921) of the United States. He was the first president from the South since the Civil War. Despite having learning disabilities, he earned a doctorate in political science. He became New Jersey’s governor in 1910. During World War I, he tried to keep the United States neutral. Eventually America joined the War. After the war, he was instrumental in creating the League of Nations. However, Congress voted against joining the League. He won the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize. In that same year Wilson suffered a stroke, and his wife, Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, hid his condition from the country. Children can visit a website at: Woodrow Wilson.

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