Dec 252018
 

Creation by Sandie

Christmas is today! Perhaps children would like to say “Merry Christmas” in other languages?

Joyeux Noël – French

God Jul – Norwegian

Froehlich Weihnachten  – German

Feliz Navidad – Spanish

Buon Natale – Italian

Nadolig LLawen – Welsh

Gajan Kristnaskon – Esperanto

Feliz Natal – Portuguese

Весела Коледа – Bulgarian

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Dec 252018
 

General Washington and his army secretly crossed the Delaware River in 1776 and surprised the British troops in Trenton. The American victory was a milestone in the Revolutionary War. A number of children’s books have been written about the event. Lynne Cheyney’s When Washington Crossed the Delaware: A Wintertime Story for Young Patriots is an excellent book. They can visit the Washington Crossing State Park site at: Washington Crossing.

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Dec 252018
 

World Wide Web trial run was first successfully conducted in 1990. The Internet and the World Wide Web are not synonymous. The Internet is the hardware and systems, and the World Wide Web is the data that browsers allow us to exchange. Tim Berners-Lee in 1990 developed Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), a way for computers to talk to each other. Others developed browsers to make the process easier. The WorldWideWeb, originally its name, allowed the use of the Internet to increase exponentially. Berners-Lee, a British citizen, was knighted for his work in 2004. A timeline of computers and their uses can be found at: http://www.history-timelines.org.uk/events-timelines/07-computer-history-timeline.htm

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Dec 252018
 
Clara Barton 1865

Clara Barton 1865

Clara Barton (born Oxford, Massachusetts, 1821; died Glen Echo, Maryland, April 12, 1912) was the founder of the American Red Cross. During the Civil War, she began helping the wounded. She also started a system to find missing soldiers. After the war, she traveled to Europe. She observed the International Red Cross in action. She returned to the United States and in 1881 founded what was later known as the American Red Cross. She worked as its president until 1904. Children can visit the AMAZING National Park Service site of her home, featuring virtual tours and handouts, at: Clara Barton.

Cab Calloway (born Rochester, New York, 1907; died Hosckessin, Delaware, November 18, 1994) was a jazz singer and bandleader. One of his most famous songs is “Minnie the Moocher.” Children can view him performing “Hi-De-Ho” on Sesame Street at: Cab Calloway.

Isaac Newton (born Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire, England, 1642; died London, England, March 20, 1727) was a mathematician, scientist and writer. He is remembered for three major contributions. He developed calculus, a branch of mathematics. He discovered relationships of light and color. He delineated theories of motion and gravity. All three of the accomplishments were made in an eighteen-month period. Children could eat Fig Newtons and carry out experiments with prisms.

Robert Ripley (born Santa Rosa, California, 1893; died 1949) was the creator of the Believe It or Not cartoons, books and museums. The first Believe It or Not cartoon appeared in New York City’s Globe December 19, 1918. Experts believe the peak readership for his work was about 80 million people. Children could create their own “Believe It or Nots.”

Help! I'm a Prisoner in the Library

Help! I’m a Prisoner in the Library

Eth Clifford (New York, New York, 1915) has written over 80 books for children. Her books include Help! I’m a Prisoner in the Library and the Flatfoot Fox mystery series.

Pam Muñoz Ryan (born Bakersfield, California, 1951) writes children’s books. Her Esperanza Rising received both the 2002 Pura Belpré Award and the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award. The Dreamer earned the 2011 Pura Belpré Award. When Marian Sang was a Robert F. Sibert Honor Book. Children can visit her website, which includes free readers’ theater scripts, at: Pam Munoz Ryan.

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