Sep 092018
 

National Grandparents’ Day

National Grandparents’ Day is today, the first Sunday following Labor Day. It was made a holiday by Presidential Proclamation by Jimmy Carter in 1978.

Share Button
Sep 092018
 

Rosh Hashanah, New Year in the Jewish calendar, begins today at sundown and concludes Tuesday, September 11 at sundown. The days are spent in worship and with family. Yom Kippur begins on September 18 at sundown and concludes on September 19 at sundown. Children could learn more by reading Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, by Howard Greenfield.

Share Button
Sep 092018
 
North Korea

Flag of North Korea

North Korea celebrates Founding Day, the day in 1948 when the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was created. The country’s area is about the same as the area of the state of Mississippi. Almost 25 million people live in North Korea, and Pyongyang is the capital.

Share Button
Sep 092018
 
Tajikistan

Flag of Tajikistan

Tajikistan celebrates Independence Day. It separated itself from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in 1991. Tajikistan, covered with mountains, is prone to earthquakes. This landlocked country is slightly smaller than the state of Wisconsin. Almost nine million people live in the country, and Dushanbe is the capital.

Share Button
Sep 092018
 
California

California Flag

Sequoia National Park in California

Sequoia National Park in California

California became the thirty-first state of the United States in 1850. It is about third in land area but first in population. It produces so many goods that it is actually about the sixth largest economy in the world. One of its concerns is that it lacks water to sustain both population growth and agricultural needs. Sacramento is the capital, and the nickname is the Golden State. The state motto is Eureka, meaning I have found it. It has had eight major earthquakes since 1900. Children could visit an Internet site at: California.

Share Button
Sep 092018
 

Athens defeated Persia at the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC. Idea: Children could learn about the concept of running a marathon.

Share Button
Sep 092018
 

flagSecond Continental Congress officially named our country the “United States of America” in 1776. Previously, the country’s title was “United Colonies of America.”

Share Button
Sep 092018
 

Stono’s Rebellion began in 1793 near the Stono River in South Carolina. A group of slaves tried to escape, but eventually the slave owners found them. This rebellion was one of the 250 documented uprisings in slavery. Children could learn more at: Stono’s Rebellion.

Share Button
Sep 092018
 
Imperial Crown

Imperial Crown

Queen Elizabeth II in 2015 became the United Kingdom’s longest reigning monarch. Her length of reign surpassed that of Queen Victoria, her great-great grandmother. Queen Victoria was Britain’s monarch for 63 years, 216 days. Queen Elizabeth II has worked with thirteen Prime Ministers.

Share Button
Sep 092018
 
Esther Cleveland

Esther Cleveland

Esther Cleveland (born White House, Washington, DC,1893; died New Hampshire, June 25, 1980) was the daughter of President Grover Cleveland and First Lady Frances Cleveland. She was the first and only child to be born in the White House.

Aileen Fisher (born Iron River, Michigan, 1906; died Boulder, Colorado, December 2, 2002) was a children’s author. Known for both her poetry and prose, Ms. Fisher also wrote plays and biographies. Children could learn more about her at: Aileen Fisher.

Leo Tolstoy (born south of Moscow, Russia, 1828; died Astapovo, Russia, November 20, 1910) was a novelist and a philosopher. He was concerned about the disparity between the “haves” and the “have nots.” Two of his most famous novels are War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Children could visit Project Gutenberg to read many of his books at Project Gutenberg.

Share Button