Aug 152018
 
Liechtenstein Flag

Flag of Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein celebrates Assumption Day, a national holiday. This tiny principality, about the size of Washington, DC, is located between Austria and Switzerland. About 37,000 people live in this country of a low valley surrounded by mountains. Vaduz is the capital. Interesting fact: Liechtenstein is one of two doubly landlocked countries. Uzbekistan is the other country.

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Aug 152018
 
South Korea Flag

Flag of South Korea

South Korea celebrates Liberation Day. In 1945 it became free of Japanese rule. Its area is slightly larger than the area of Indiana, and mountains and hills cover the northwestern portion while a coastal plain covers the southeastern portion. Almost 49 million people live there, and Seoul is the capital.

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Aug 152018
 
Republic of Congo Flag

Flag of Republic of the Congo

Republic of the Congo celebrates Independence Day. It became free from French control in 1960. Located on the western coast of Africa, this country, about the size of the state of Montana, exports sugarcane, coffee and many other products. About 4.5 million people live in the Republic of the Congo, and Brazzaville is the capital.

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Aug 152018
 
Kissing the War Goodbye

Kissing the War Goodbye

World War II informally ended in 1945. When President Truman proclaimed that the Japanese had surrendered, people rejoiced around the world. The official surrender took place on September 2, 1945, in Tokyo Bay aboard the USS Missouri. Idea: Children could make a timeline of World War II.

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Aug 152018
 
Napoleon Bonaparte

Napoleon Bonaparte

Napoleon Bonaparte (born Corsica, 1769; died St. Helena, May 5, 1821) was a French emperor.

Stephen G. Breyer (born San Francisco, California, 1938) is an associate justice of the Supreme Court. Appointed by Bill Clinton, he took over his duties regarding the Supreme Court on August 3, 1994.

Walter Crane (born United Kingdom, 1845; died United Kingdom, March 14, 1915) was a famous illustrator of children’s books. He, Randolph Caldecott, and Kate Greenaway formed a powerful triumvirate that invigorated children’s literature. Children can view many of his works at: Project Gutenberg. They could learn more about Crane at: Walter Crane.

Edna Ferber (born Kalamazoo, Michigan, 1887; died New York, New York, April 16, 1968) was a novelist. So Big was very popular, and it won her a Pulitzer Prize. Children can read some of her works at: Project Gutenberg.

Florence Kling Harding

Florence Kling Harding

Florence Kling Harding (born Marion, Ohio, 1860; died Marion, Ohio, November 21, 1924) was the wife of Warren Harding, twenty-ninth president of the United States. Children can visit a website at: Florence Kling Harding. Idea: One child could research Mrs. Harding’s life and pretend to be her. The rest could have a question and answer session with “Mrs. Harding.”

Theresa Nelson (born Beaumont, Texas, 1948) writes books for children. Her works include Earthshine and The Empress of Elsewhere. Children can visit her website at: Theresa Nelson.

Edith Nesbit (born Kennington, Surrey, England, 1858; died New Romney, Kent, England, May 4, 1924) wrote books for both children and adults. Her most famous children’s books include The Railway Children and Five Children and It. Children can learn more at: Edith Nesbit.

Sir Walter Scott (born Edinburgh, Scotland, 1771; died Abbotsford, Scotland, September 21, 1832) was a famous poet. Children can read many of his works at: Project Gutenberg.

Brinton Turkle (born Alliance, Ohio, 1915; died Santa Fe, New Mexico, 2003) wrote and illustrated books for children. His works include Do Not Open and Deep in the Forest. He received a 1970 Caldecott Honor Award for Thy Friend, Obadiah. Children could learn more at: Brinton Turkle.

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