Mar 272018
 

Japanese Cherry Trees in Blossom

Cherry trees were first planted in Washington, DC, in 1912. First Lady Helen Herron Taft and Viscountess Chinda (the Japanese ambassador’s wife) planted the first of three thousand trees. The original trees were a gift from Japan to the United States. Since then, some propagates from the trees have been sent back to Japan. Other propagates have been planted around Washington, DC, to maintain the lineage. Children can learn more at: Cherry Trees.

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Mar 272018
 
White House Reconstruction—2

White House Reconstruction

President Truman and his family moved back into the White House in 1952 after major renovations had been completed.

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Mar 272018
 

Julia Alvarez (born New York, New York, 1950) writes books for children. Her book Before We Were Free received the 2004 Pura Belpré Medal, and Alvarez earned another Pura Belpré Medal in 2010 for Return to Sender. Children can visit her website at: Julia Alvarez.

Nathaniel Currier (born Roxbury, Massachusetts, 1813; died New York, New York, November 20, 1888) was a lithographer. He was part of the famous Currier and Ives partnership. Their lithographs answered a need for reasonably priced art. Now the originals are very expensive.

Dick King-Smith (born England, 1922; died England, January 4, 2011) wrote at least 135 books for children. His book The Sheep-Pig became the movie Babe. Children could learn more at: Dick King-Smith.

Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen (born Lennap, Prussia, 1845; died Munich, Germany, February 10, 1923) discovered X-rays. He won a 1901 Nobel Prize for his work. Children can learn more at: Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen.

Edward Steichen (born Luxembourg, 1879; died West Redding, Connecticut, March 25, 1973) was a photographer. Children could view a collection of his photographic portraits at: Edward Steichen.

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