Mar 262018
 
Bangladesh

Flag of Bangladesh

Bangladesh celebrates Independence Day. In 1971 Bangladesh declared its freedom from Pakistan. According to the CIA World Factbook, Bangladesh is about the size of the state of Iowa. About 161 million people live in the country, making it the eighth most populous country in the world. Dhaka is the capital. Farmers grow rice, jute, and tea in one of the rainiest climates in the world.

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Mar 262018
 

Lifeboat patented by Joseph Francis of New York New York, in 1845. He invented a lifeboat made from corrugated sheet iron in 1845. He received Patent Number 3,974. His invention saved 200 of 201 lives at danger when the ship Ayreshire ran aground in 1850. Children could see his patent at: Lifeboat.

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Mar 262018
 

Fire extinguisher patented by Thomas J. Martin in 1872. Patent Number 125,063 called for a system of pipes and valves for a building. He did not patent the portable, wall-mounted fire extinguishers of today. Children can see his patent at: Fire Extinguisher.

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Mar 262018
 
Popeye statue in Crystal City, Texas

Popeye Statue in Crystal City, Texas

Spinach farmers in Crystal City, Texas, built a statue of Popeye in 1937. About half the spinach consumed in the United States is grown in Texas. China is the world’s leading producer of spinach. Children can learn about spinach and its nutritional values at: Spinach.

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Mar 262018
 

T. A. Barron (born Boston, Massachusetts, 1952) writes fantasy books for children and young adults. His books include The Adventures of Kate trilogy and The Lost Years of Merlin epic. Children can view his website at: T. A. Barron.

Nathaniel Bowditch (1773-1838), American mathematician and actuary.jpeg

Nathaniel Bowditch

Nathaniel Bowditch (born Salem, Massachusetts, 1773; died Boston, Massachusetts, March 16, 1838) was an astronomer and author. He wrote The New American Practical Navigator in 1802, and many of his ideas still apply. Children could read Jean Lee Latham’s Carry On, Mr. Bowditch, published in 1955. The book won the 1956 Newbery Award.

Robert Frost (born San Francisco, California, 1875; died Boston, Massachusetts, January 29, 1963) was a poet. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1924, 1931, 1937, and 1943. Students might enjoy reading and hearing some of his poetry. One of his most famous poems is “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.” Children can read many of his works at: Project Gutenberg.

Betty MacDonald (born Boulder, Colorado, 1908; died Seattle, Washington, February 7, 1958) wrote books for children and adults. Her children’s books include the Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle series and Nancy and Plum. Children could learn more at: Betty MacDonald.

Sandra Day O'Conner

Sandra Day O’Conner

Sandra Day O’Conner (born El Paso, Texas, 1930) is a retired Supreme Court Associate Justice. She is the first woman to sit on the Supreme Court, serving from September 21, 1981 to January 31, 2006. She has also written several children’s books, including Chico and Finding Susie.

Jerry Pallotta (born Boston, Massachusetts, 1953) writes books for children. His books include the Who Would Win series and The Skull Alphabet Book. Children can visit his website, particularly the hidden secrets section, at: Jerry Pallotta.

Tennessee Williams (born Columbus, Mississippi, 1911; died New York, New York, February 25, 1983) was a playwright. One of his plays was The Glass Menagerie.

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