Mar 252018
 
Greece

Flag of Greece

Greece celebrates Independence Day. It became free from Turkey’s rule in 1821. The country, composed of a mainland and many small islands, according to the CIA World Factbook, is a bit less than the size of Alabama. Almost 11 million people live in Greece. Athens is the capital. About 15 percent of the economy comes from tourism.

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Mar 252018
 

Maryland was colonized by Lord Baltimore’s group in 1634. Catholics and protestants arrived on two ships, the Ark and the Dove. Lord Baltimore wanted to establish a colony where Catholics would not be persecuted.

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Mar 252018
 
pecans

Pecans

Pecan Day marks the day in 1775 when Thomas Jefferson gave George Washington several pecan trees from his own plantings. Some of Washington’s pecan trees are still alive. The only nut native to North America is the pecan.

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Mar 252018
 
Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail

Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail

Civil Rights March started in Selma, Alabama, reached the destination of Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965. Civil Rights marchers, led by Martin Luther King, Jr. began their journey on March 21. They camped overnight on three occasions, and the number of marchers swelled to 25,000. Two unsuccessful marches predated this march. President Johnson had to bring in soldiers and the National Guard to protect the marchers. Outcomes of the march included the 1965 Voting Rights Act and the voting registration of blacks in unprecedented numbers. The road that the marchers used is now a National Historic Trail.

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Mar 252018
 
Mount Rushmore

Mount Rushmore

John de la Mothe Gutzon Borglum (born Bear Lake, Idaho, 1867; died Chicago, Illinois, March 6, 1941) was an artist. In 1916 he sculpted Stone Mountain in Georgia, a memorial to the Confederate Army. He began to sculpt Mount Rushmore in 1927, but he died before it was completed. Children could learn more at: Gutzon Borglun.

Kate DiCamillo (born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1964) writes books for children. Her books include Because of Winn-Dixie (a 2001 Newbery Award winner) and The Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread (2004 Newbery Medal book). She also writes the Mercy Watson series. Children can visit her website at: Kate DiCamillo.

Richard Dobbs Spaight (born New Bern, North Carolina, 1758; died in a duel near New Bern, North Carolina, September 5, 1802) represented North Carolina at the Constitutional Convention. Following the convention, he served as the state’s governor and then one of its U.S. representatives. He also served as a state senator.

Linda Sue Park (born Urbana, Illinois, 1960) writes books for children. Her books include A Single Shard (2002 Newbery Medal book) and A Long Walk to Water (2011 Jane Addams Children’s Book Award. Children can view her website, including the fun (quizzes) section, at: Linda Sue Park.

Interesting fact…both Kate DiCamillo and Linda Sue Park wrote stories for The Chronicles of Harris Burdick: Fourteen Amazing Authors Tell the Tales, based on Chris Van Allsburg’s book, The Mysteries of Harris Burdick.

Arturo Toscanini (born Parma, Italy, 1867; died New York, New York, January 16, 1957) was a conductor.

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