Jan 312018
 

Backwards Day is celebrated today. Children could wear shirts or hats backward today.

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Jan 312018
 
Nauru

Flag of Nauru

Nauru celebrates Independence Day. It gained its independence from a United Nations Trusteeship managed by Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom in 1968. Nauru is a small island, only 8.1 square miles (one-tenth the size of Washington, DC), and supports about 10,000 inhabitants. Yaren is the capital. The interior used to hold reserves of phosphates, used to make fertilizers. However, the phosphates have been exhausted. Located just south of the equator in Micronesia, the country has a tropical climate.

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Jan 312018
 

A. G. MacDonald in 1905 drove an automobile for the first time faster than one hundred miles per hour. The speed trial was located in Daytona Beach, Florida.

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Jan 312018
 

First Social Security check was issued in 1940. Ida May Fuller of Ludlow, Vermont, received check 00-000-001 for $22.54. She lived to the age of 100. Today over 64 million people receive Social Security checks. Children can learn more at: https://www.ssa.gov/history/imf.html.

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Jan 312018
 

Explorer1First U. S. Satellite Explorer I was launched in 1958, four months after Sputnik 1 and Sputnik 2 were sent into space. It returned data, including confirmation of the Van Allen Radiation Belts, to the United States for four months until the batteries died. More than 90 more Explorer projects followed.

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Jan 312018
 

Denise Fleming (born Toledo, Ohio, 1950) writes and illustrates children’s books. Her book In the Small, Small Pond received a 1995 Caldecott Honor Award. She has published 20 books using an unusual illustrating technique. She produces her own paper pulp, adds vivid dyes, and forces the pulp through stencils. Then she combines these images to produce her illustrations. Children can learn more about her techniques at: Denise Fleming

Zane Grey (born Zanesville, Ohio, 1872; died Altadena, California, October 23, 1939) was a novelist best known for his westerns. Two of his most famous works were Riders of the Purple Sage and The Last of the Plainsmen. He wrote more than fifty books. Young adults can read many of his books at: Project Gutenberg

Gerald McDermott (born Detroit, Michigan, 1941; died Los Angeles, California, December 26, 2012) was a children’s book author and illustrator. His book Anansi the Spider received a 1973 Caldecott Honor Award. Next, Arrow to the Sun earned the 1975 Caldecott Medal. In 1993 Raven: A Trickster Tale from the Pacific Northwest received a Caldecott Honor Award. Children could learn more at: Gerald McDermott.

Gouverneur Morris (born Morrisania, New York, 1752; died November 6, 1816) was an American patriot. He attended the Continental Congress and after the war helped Robert Morris settle the United States financially. He was minister to England and France and was a senator from New York.

Morris

Robert Morris

Robert Morris (born Liverpool, England, 1734; died Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 9, 1806) was an American patriot and a merchant. He was one of only two men who signed all three important documents, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution. After the Revolutionary War, he helped the new country get on its feet financially. He was also a senator from the state of Pennsylvania. Later he was forced into bankruptcy and had to go to debtor’s prison. Children could visit a website at: Robert Morris.

Jackie Robinson (born Cairo, Georgia, 1919; died Stamford, Connecticut, October 24, 1972) was a baseball player. He left the army in 1945 as a first lieutenant and played baseball for the Monarchs, a team in the Negro American League. He was then signed to the Royals, a minor league team. After one season, he moved to the Brooklyn Dodgers and became the first African American to play for the major leagues. He played second base from 1947 to 1956. He was also the first African American to be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Children could read a great biography, A Picture Book of Jackie Robinson, by David A. Adler.

Franz Schubert (born Vienna, Austria, 1797; died Vienna, Austria, November 19, 1828) was a composer. His music combined classicism and romanticism. He created over six hundred pieces of music, but he was not popular during his own lifetime. His works include Unfinished Symphony and Die Zauberharfe (The Magic Harp).

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