Dec 292017
 
Texas State Flag

Texas State Flag

Texas became the twenty-eighth state of the United States in 1845. Its name derives from the Caddo tavshas, meaning “friends.” Its nickname is the Lone Star State, and Austin is the capital. While it is the second largest state of the Union, more than three-fourths of the population lives in cities. Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio are listed in America’s ten largest cities. At one time Texas belonged to Spain. Then Mexico claimed ownership. For a while Texas was an independent country, and then it joined the United States. Oil is a major natural resource, and the state produces cotton and cattle. The state dish is chili. Children could visit an Internet site at: Texas. They could also make and eat chili.

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Dec 292017
 
Artist's Conception of Black Hole

Artist’s Conception of Black Hole

Term “black hole” was created by Professor John Wheeler in 1967. A black hole is a region in space where nothing, including light, can escape. Children can learn a great deal more about black holes at: http://hubblesite.org/explore_astronomy/black_holes/

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Dec 292017
 

Molly Garrett Bang (born Princeton, New Jersey, 1943) has written and/or illustrated at least 30 books for children. She illustrated, among other works, The Grey Lady and the Strawberry Snatcher, a wordless book. It received a 1981 Caldecott Honor Award. Ten, Nine, Eight received a 1984 Caldecott Award. When Sophie Gets Angry – Really Really Angry… earned a 2000 Caldecott Honor Award. Visit her website at: Molly Garrett Bang.

Pablo Carlos Salvador Defillio de Casals (born Venrell, Spain, 1876; died Rio Pedros, Puerto Rico, October 22, 1973) was a famous cellist.

Charles Goodyear (born New Haven, Connecticut, 1800; died New York, New York, July 1, 1860) was an inventor. He was trying to develop a form of crude rubber. However, it cracked when it got cold. It stuck to other materials when it got hot. One day Goodyear accidentally dropped some rubber and sulfur on a hot stove. This vulcanization process made the rubber useful. Children can learn more about Goodyear and rubber at: Rubber.

E. W. Hildick (born Bradford, England, 1925; died London, England, 2001) wrote many books for children. His works include Jack McGurk and Birdy Jones.

Andrew Johnson

Andrew Johnson

Andrew Johnson (born Raleigh, North Carolina, 1808; died Carter’s Station, Tennessee, July 31, 1875) was the seventeenth president (1865-1869) of the United States. Johnson’s father died when Andrew was three years old. Although he never went to school, he obviously had a great deal of common sense. He rose from being Greenville, Tennessee’s mayor to state legislator. He was the governor of Tennessee before he was elected to the United States Senate. Since he remained loyal to the Union, he was almost hanged in Tennessee. He was Lincoln’s vice president and became president when Lincoln was assassinated. He was impeached, but he was found not guilty by one vote. Children can visit a website at: Andrew Johnson. Idea: Children could make a flow chart of the steps of impeachment. Why was he impeached?

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