Oct 312017
 
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Halloween

Halloween is celebrated by trick-or-treaters all over the country. Experts believe the holiday has both Christian and pagan origins. The day before All Saints Day, the event first occurred in Europe and then spread to the United States.

Children could read Scarry, Scarry Halloween by Jan Brett and then visit her website at: http://www.janbrett.com/index.html to find some Halloween activities.

One last Halloween riddle: What is a monster’s favorite play? Answer: Romeo and Ghouliet!

Answer to yesterday’s riddle: What do witches put on their hair? Answer: Scare spray!

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Oct 312017
 

UNICEF Day has been observed by Presidential Proclamation since 1967. Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund) began in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1949. The organization received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1965. UNICEF helps children in over 190 countries, and the organization worked to eradicate polio in over 120 countries. Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF has raised over $188 million since its inception. Children can learn more at: http://www.unicefusa.org/.

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Oct 312017
 
Nevada

Nevada Flag

Nevada became the thirty-sixth state of the United States in 1864. Its name comes from a Spanish phrase meaning “snow-covered.” Its nicknames are the Sagebrush State and the Silver State. Carson City is the state capital. It was explored in 1776, but the first settlement was not built until 1849. In 1859 the Comstock Lode was discovered, and mining fever took over. In 1931 gambling became legal. Children could visit a website at: America’s Library. Idea: Students could pretend they were miners in old Nevada. What materials would they need to buy before they could amble on out to their stake?

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Oct 312017
 

Martin Luther in 1517 nailed his 95 Theses, also called the “Disputation on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences,” to the church door in Wittenburg, Germany. His actions and the actions of others started the Reformation. Older children could read a transcription in English of his statements at: Luther 95 Theses.

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Oct 312017
 
Harry Houdini

Harry Houdini

National Magic Day is celebrated today in memory of Harry Houdini who died this day in 1926.  Children could learn more about Houdini at: America’s Library.

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Oct 312017
 
Mount Rushmore

Mount Rushmore

Mount Rushmore was completed in 1941. The project, depicting likenesses of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson, and Theodore Roosevelt, began on October 3, 1927. Nearly three million people visit it each year. Children could visit the park’s website at: http://www.nps.gov/moru/.

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Oct 312017
 

Earl Lloyd in 1950 became the first African American to play for the NBA. He played for the Washington Capitols at a game held in Rochester, New York.

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Oct 312017
 

Jim Benton (born Michigan, 1960) writes and illustrates books for children. His works include the Franny K. Stein series and the It’s Happy Bunny series. Children can visit his website at: Jim Benton

John Keats (born London, England, 1795; died Rome, Italy, February 23, 1821) was a great English poet. Children could read some of his works at: Project Gutenberg.

Juliette Magill Kinzie Gordon Low (born Savannah, Georgia, 1860; died Savannah, Georgia, January 17, 1927) created the American Girl Scouts. When she was traveling in Europe, she became friends with Robert Baden-Powell, the founder of the Boy Scouts. When she returned to the United States in 1912, she organized the first group of Girl Guides. In 1915 the organization’s name was changed to the Girl Scouts. Idea: Perhaps a Girl Scout could speak to the group.

William Paca

William Paca

William Paca (born Abingdon, Maryland, 1740; died Talbot County, Maryland, October 23, 1799) signed the Declaration of Independence. He represented Maryland. He spent quite a bit of his own money to provide supplies to the Revolutionary War soldiers. After the Revolutionary War, he became a United States district justice. He also made several suggestions regarding the Bill of Rights.

Paterson

Jip, His Story

Katherine Paterson (born Qing Jiang, Jiansi, China, 1932) is a children’s author. She earned the 1978 Newbery Medal for Bridge to Terabithia, a 1979 Newbery Honor Award for The Great Gilly Hopkins, and the 1981 Newbery Medal for Jacob Have I Loved. She received the 1997 Scott O’Dell Award for Jip, His Story, the Hans Christian Andersen Medal in 1998, the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2006, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal in 2013. Children can visit her website at: http://www.terabithia.com/about.html

Taylor

All-of-a-Kind Family

Sydney Taylor (born New York, New York, 1904; died New York, New York, February 12, 1978) wrote books for children. Her books include the fascinating All-of-a-Kind Family series and Danny Loves a Holiday. After her death, her husband created the Sydney Taylor Book Award in her honor. The award honors the best Jewish writers and illustrators every year. Children can read more about Sydney Taylor and the Sydney Taylor Book Award from Children’s Book Award Handbook by Diana F. Marks.

Jan Vermeer (born Delft, Netherlands, 1632; died Delft, Netherlands, December 15, 1675) was a Dutch painter. Experts believe he painted only 35 or 36 works. Children can view several of his works at: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/verm/hd_verm.htm.

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