Oct 272017
 

pumpkins (2)Halloween is four days away! Are costumes ready? Is candy purchased? Children might want to read Room on the Broom, written by Julia Donaldson and illustrated by Axel Scheffler. They could also visit the PBS website at: http://pbskids.org/halloween/.

Children could answer this Halloween riddle: What is a witch’s favorite subject in school? Check back tomorrow for the answer!

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Oct 272017
 
Saint Vincent Gren

Flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines celebrate Independence Day. Located in the Caribbean, the one large island of St. Vincent and the fifty smaller Grenadines islands gained their freedom from the United Kingdom in 1979. However, they are still part of the British Commonwealth. The total area of the country is about twice the size of Washington, DC. Banana production and tourism provide many of the local jobs. About 103,000 people live there, and Kingstown is the capital.

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Oct 272017
 
Turkmenistan

Flag of Turkmenistan

Turkmenistan celebrates Independence Day. It separated from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in 1991. Slightly larger than the state of California, Turkmenistan borders the Caspian Sea. Two important agricultural products are cotton and wheat. Over five million people live in Turkmenistan, and Ashgabat is the capital.

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Oct 272017
 
Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was founded in 1682 by William Penn. The City of Brotherly Love was originally laid out in a grid system with many parks. Today Philadelphia is the fifth largest city in the United States. Children can learn some “Philadelphia Firsts” at: Philadelphia Firsts.

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Oct 272017
 

First essay of the Federalist Papers was published in 1787 in a New York City newspaper. John Jay, James Madison and Alexander Hamilton wrote the essays to persuade people to adopt the new Constitution. The last of the 85 essays was published April 4, 1788. Children can read or listen to someone else read the Federalist Papers at: Project Gutenberg.

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Oct 272017
 

New York City subway began operating in 1904. The mass transit system was the first in the world to be built underground. Today about 5.4 million rides occur on the subway every workday.

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Oct 272017
 

Enid Bagnold (born Rochester, Kent, England, 1889; died London, England, March 31, 1981) was a novelist and playwright. One of her books is National Velvet. Children could learn more at: Enid Bagnold.

James Cook

James Cook

James Cook (born Martin-in-Cleveland, near Whitby, Yorkshire, England, 1728; died Kealakekwa Bay, Hawaii, February 14, 1779) was an explorer. He made three trips though the Pacific area. He sailed around the world twice. His last voyage was to locate the Northwest Passage. He was killed by natives when he went to investigate a boat theft. Idea: Cartographers could mark his various voyages on a map. They could find out what foods he brought back to Europe.

Jared Ingersoll (born New Haven, Connecticut, October 27, 1749; died Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 31, 1822) represented Pennsylvania at the Constitutional Convention. A lawyer, he spoke little at the Convention, but he was well respected. Later he became a judge.

Roy Lichtenstein (born New York, New York, 1923; died New York, New York, September 29, 1997) was an artist, known for his pop art movement. Some of his works resembled comic strips. Children can view some of his works at: Roy Lichtenstein.

Nicolo Paganini (born Genoa, Italy, 1782; died Nice, France, May 27, 1840) was a famed violin virtuoso. He also composed works for the violin.

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt (born New York, New York, 1858; died Oyster Bay, New York, January 6, 1919) was the twenty-sixth president (1901-1909) of the United States. He was a sickly child, often experiencing asthma attacks. He challenged himself as an adult. He even climbed the Matterhorn. He became a lawyer; but after the death of his first wife, he ran a cattle ranch in North Dakota. During the Spanish-American War, he led the Rough Riders up San Juan Hill. Later he became governor of New York and then vice-president to William McKinley. When McKinley died, Roosevelt became the youngest president at age 42. During his presidency he established 150 million acres of national parks and forests. He authorized the building of the Panama Canal. He received the Nobel Peace Prize for helping to resolve the Russo-Japanese War. The teddy bear is named in honor of him. Children could visit a website at: Theodore Roosevelt.  They could also read Bully for You, Teddy Roosevelt by Jean Fritz, and then make a timeline of Roosevelt’s exciting life.

Dylan Thomas (born Swansea, Walsea, 1914; died New York, New York, November 9, 1953) was a poet and a playwright. His works include Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Twenty-Five Poems.

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