Oct 162017
 
Dictionary

Webster’s Dictionary

National Dictionary Day honors Noah Webster’s birth. Children could participate in the “Dictionary Olympics.” One event could be the fastest finder of words. Another event could be the best user of guide words.

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Oct 162017
 
John Brown

John Brown

John Brown and his party raided the United States arsenal in Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia in 1859. Within days he was captured, and he was hanged on December 2, 1859. Children could learn more at: John Brown.

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Oct 162017
 

DSC_0219World Food Day marks the founding of the Food and Agriculture Organization in 1945. The organization is part of the United Nations. This year’s theme is “Change the Future of Migration. Invest in Food Security and Rural Development.” Children could visit a website at: World Food Day.

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Oct 162017
 

Million Man March occurred in 1995. African-American men joined together in Washington, DC, for a “holy day of atonement and reconciliation.”

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Oct 162017
 

Joseph Bruchac (born Greenfield Center, New York, 1942) has written more than 120 books. His ethnicity includes a Native American background, and his works focus on the indigenous peoples of America. One of his books is Between Earth and Sky. Children can visit his website at: Joseph Bruchac.

Jonathan Dayton (born Elizabeth, New Jersey, October 16, 1760; died Elizabeth, New Jersey, October 9, 1824) represented New Jersey at the Constitutional Convention. He was the youngest member. Later, he invested in land in what is today Ohio. The city of Dayton is named after him.

Eugene Gladstone O’Neill (born New York, New York, 1888; died Boston, Massachusetts, November 27, 1953) was an American playwright. He received the 1936 Nobel Prize for Literature and four Pulitzer Prizes for his plays. One of those plays is Long Day’s Journey into Night.

Noah Webster

Noah Webster

Noah Webster (born West Hartford, Connecticut, 1758; died New Haven, Connecticut, May 28, 1843) was a teacher and a writer. He was also a lexicographer, compiling one of the first American dictionaries.

Oscar Wilde (born Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde in Dublin, Ireland, 1854; died Paris, France, November 30, 1900) was a playwright and poet. One of his most important works was The Importance of Being Earnest. Older children can read many of his works at: Project Gutenberg.

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