Aug 052016
 
Armstrong on the Moon

Armstrong on the Moon

Neil Alden Armstrong (born Wapakoneta, Ohio, 1930; died Cincinnati, Ohio, August 25, 2012) was an astronaut and the first person to walk on the moon. Children can learn more at: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/who-was-neil-armstrong-k4.html

Robert Bright (born Sandwich, Massachusetts, 1902; died San Francisco, California, November 21, 1988) wrote and illustrated children’s books. He is best known for his Georgie the Ghost series.

Thomas Lynch, Jr. (born Prince George’s Parish, South Carolina, 1749; died 1779) signed the Declaration of Independence. He represented South Carolina. His father was supposed to also sign the Declaration of Independence, but he became too ill. After the younger Lynch left Philadelphia, he became sick. He and his wife decided to take an ocean voyage to improve his health. They were lost at sea in late 1779.

Guy de Maupassant (born Normandy, France, 1850; died Paris, France, July 6, 1893) was a famous short story writer. He wrote at least 250 stories, including The Diamond Necklace, and several novels. Children can read many of his works at: http://www.gutenberg.org/.

Maud Petersham (born Kingston, New York, 1890; died November 29, 1971) was, with her husband Miska, an early pioneer in children’s literature. They illustrated more than 60 books written by other authors. Then they began writing and illustrating their own works (about 100 books). They received a 1942 Caldecott Honor Award for An American ABC and then the 1946 Caldecott Medal for The Rooster Crows. Children could learn more at: http://www.bookologymagazine.com/resources/authors-emeritus/petersham-maud/

Ruth Sawyer (born Boston, Massachusetts, 1880; died Maine, June 3, 1970) wrote children’s books. She received the 1937 Newbery Medal for Roller Skates. She earned the 1965 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for her body of works. Children can learn more at: http://www.bookologymagazine.com/resources/authors-emeritus/sawyer-ruth/

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Aug 062016
 

Frank Asch (born Somerville, New Jersey, 1946) is a children’s author and illustrator. He is known for his Moonbear series. Children could visit his website, particularly his animated stories, at: http://frankasch.com/.

ox cart man

Ox-Cart Man

Barbara Cooney (born Brooklyn, New York, 1917; died Portland, Maine, March 10, 2000) was a children’s author and illustrator. Her illustrations in Chanticleer and the Fox won the 1959 Caldecott Medal, and her illustrations in Ox-cart Man won the 1980 Caldecott Medal. Children can visit a website at: http://www.bookologymagazine.com/resources/authors-emeritus/cooney-barbara/

Sir Alexander Fleming (born Lochfield, Scotland, 1881; died London, England, March 11, 1955) was a bacteriologist. He discovered penicillin and received the 1945 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt (born Norwich, Connecticut, 1861; died Sagamore Hill, New York, September 30, 1948) was the second wife of Theodore Roosevelt, twenty-sixth president of the United States. They had five children, and he also had a daughter by his first marriage. Children could visit a website at: http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=26. Idea: Children could investigate what the Roosevelt children did while they were living in the White House. Did they really take a pony upstairs?

Alfred, Lord Tennyson (born Somersby, Lincolnshire, England, 1899; died Aldworth, England, October 6, 1892) was a poet. Children could read many of his works at: http://www.gutenberg.org/.

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Aug 072016
 

Ralph Johnson Bunche (born Detroit, Michigan, 1904; died New York, New York, December 9, 1971) was a diplomat and United Nations representative. The grandson of a former slave, he joined the United Nations in 1947. He became an undersecretary in 1955, and he received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for his work with Arabs and Jews. Children could read Ralph J. Bunch: Peacemaker by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack.

Betsy Byars (born Charlotte, North Carolina, 1928) has written over 60 books for children. She wrote among other works Cracker Jackson, 1985. Her book Summer of the Swans received the 1971 Newbery Medal, and Wanted…Mud Blossom earned the 1962 Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Literature. Children can learn more, especially about her unique house at: http://www.betsybyars.com/.

Nathanael Greene

Nathanael Greene

Nathanael Greene (born Patowomut, Rhode Island, 1742; died Savannah, Georgia, June 19, 1786) was a general during the Revolutionary War. Children could learn more at: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/colonial/jb_colonial_greene_1.html

Rudolf C. Ising (born Kansas City, Missouri, 1903; died Newport Beach, California, July 18, 1992) created, along with Hugh Harmon, Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies. He won an Academy Award for Milky Way, a cartoon about three kittens, in 1948. Idea: Children could make flip books.

Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey (born Kabete, Kenya, 1903; died London, United Kingdom, October 1, 1972) was an anthropologist. He and his wife Mary devoted their lives to finding out more about early human life in eastern Africa.

Coleen Salley (born Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1929; died September 16, 2008) wrote books for children. She published her first book when she was 72 years old! Her works include the Epossumondas series and Who’s That Tripping Over My Bridge? Children can visit a website devoted to her at: http://coleensalley.com/.

Maia Wojciechowska (born Warsaw, Poland, 1927; died Long Branch, New Jersey, June 13, 2002) wrote books for children. She wrote Shadow of a Bull, the 1965 Newbery Medal winner. Children could learn more at: http://www.bookologymagazine.com/resources/authors-emeritus/wojciechowska-maia/

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Aug 082016
 

Matthew A. Henson

Matthew A. Henson (born Charles County, Maryland, 1866; died New York, New York, March 9, 1955) was an African-American explorer. He was hired to be Robert E. Peary’s valet. The two explored the Arctic region. He described his adventures in A Negro Explorer at the North Pole. Children can read the book at: http://www.gutenberg.org/.

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (born Washington, DC, 1896; died Saint Augustine, Florida, December 14, 1953) wrote books for children. Her book The Yearling received the 1939 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, and The Secret River earned a 1956 Newbery Honor Award. Children can learn more at: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/progress/jb_progress_rawlings_1.html

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Aug 092016
 

Jose Aruego (born Manila, Philippines, 1932; died New York, New York, August 9, 2012) was a children’s author and illustrator. Idea: Children could read and enjoy some of his work, especially Mitchel is Moving. They could learn more at: http://www.bookologymagazine.com/resources/authors-emeritus/aruego-joseph/

Patricia McKissack (born Nashville, Tennessee, 1944) is a children’s author of great acclaim. She and her late husband Fredrick wrote and illustrated over 100 books together. A Long Hard Journey: The Story of the Pullman Porter earned the 1990 Coretta Scott King Medal and the 1990 Jane Addams Book Award. Sojourner Truth: Ain’t I a Woman? received a 1993 Coretta Scott King Honor Award. The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural was a 1993 Newbery Honor Book and the 1993 Coretta Scott King Medal winner. McKissack earned another Coretta Scott King Medal in 1995 for Christmas in the Big House, Christmas in the Quarters and still another Coretta Scott King Honor Award in 1997 for Rebels Against Slavery: American Slave Revolts. McKissack earned still more Coretta Scott King Honor Awards: one in 2000 for Black Hands, White Sails: The Story of African-American Whalers and one in 2004 for Days of Jubilee: The End of Slavery in the United States.

Seymour Simon (born New York, New York, 1931) is a children’s author. He has written about 250 nonfiction books about many different subjects. All of his books, including Big Cats and Neptune, reflect thoughtful research. Children could visit his amazing website at: http://www.seymoursimon.com/

P. L. Travers (born Maryborough, Queensland, Australia, 1899; died London, England, April 23, 1996) was an author. She wrote the Mary Poppins series.

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Aug 102016
 
193px-Herbert_Hoover

Herbert Hoover

Herbert Clark Hoover (born West Branch, Iowa, 1874; died New York, New York, October 20, 1964) was the thirty-first president (1929-1933) of the United States. His parents died when he was eight years old, and he was raised by Quaker relatives. He became a mining engineer and was a millionaire by age forty. During World War I he saved Americans remaining in Europe and distributed food to needy people in Belgium. His political slogan during his campaign was a “chicken in every pot.” The Great Depression took place during his administration, but he felt government should not take responsibility for what was happening. People who lost their homes built shack cities and called them Hoovervilles. He was soundly defeated by Franklin Roosevelt and was not elected to a second term. He lived another thirty years after his presidency. Children could visit a website at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/herberthoover. Idea: Children could watch a portion of the musical Annie to learn more about the conditions during the Depression.

Tony Ross (born London, England, 1938) illustrates books for children. He illustrated the Horrid Henry series and the Amber Brown series.

Margot Ladd Tomes (born Yonkers, New York, 1917; died New York, New York, June 25, 1991) illustrated more than 60 children’s books. She illustrated books written by Jean Fritz and Aileen Fisher. Children can learn more at: http://www.bookologymagazine.com/resources/authors-emeritus/tomes-margot/.

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Aug 112016
 

Joanna Cole (born Newark, New Jersey, 1944) is a children’s author.  One of her enterprises is the Magic School Bus Series. Idea: Children could dress like Ms. Frizzle. Children could learn more at: http://www.scholastic.com/magicschoolbus/books/cole.htm

Don Freeman (born San Diego, California, 1908; died February 1, 1978) was a children’s author and illustrator. One of his books is A Pocket for Corduroy. Children could learn more about him at: http://www.bookologymagazine.com/resources/authors-emeritus/freeman-don/

Alex Haley (born Ithaca, New York, 1921; died Seattle, Washington, February 13, 1992) was a writer. One of his most famous works is Roots. The book, a Pulitzer Prize-winner in 1975, has been translated into 37 languages. He also wrote The Autobiography of Malcolm X.

Steven Kroll (born New York, New York, 1941; died New York, New York, March 8, 2011) wrote at least 96 books for children. His works include Jungle Bullies and Sweet America. Children can learn more at: http://www.bookologymagazine.com/resources/authors-emeritus/kroll-steven/.

George Sullivan (born Lowell, Massachusetts, 1927) writes nonfiction books for children and young adults. His works include Matthew Brady: His Life and Photographs and Trapped.

Catherine Woolley (born Chicago, Illinois, 1904; died Truro, Massachusetts, July 23, 2005) wrote children’s books.  Often using the pen name Jane Thayer, she wrote 86 books. She is best known for The Puppy Who Wanted a Boy and Sandy and the Seventeen Glasses.

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Aug 122016
 

George Wesley Bellows (born Columbus, Ohio, 1882; died New York, New York, January 8, 1925) was an artist. He is best known for his realistic works about city life. Children could view many of his works at: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/list.php?m=a&s=du&aid=97.

Ann M. Martin (born Princeton, New Jersey, 1955) is a children’s author. She has written many books, including The Baby-Sitters Club series. Children could visit a website at: http://www.scholastic.com/annmartin/.

Christy Matthewson

Christy Matthewson

Christy Mathewson (born Factoryville, Pennsylvania, 1880; died Saranac Lake, New York, October 7, 1925) was a famous baseball player. Idea: Children could examine his baseball statistics, and they could find out if he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. This link could really help: http://baseballhall.org/hof/mathewson-christy.

Fredrick McKissack (born Nashville, Tennessee, 1939; died Chesterfield, Missouri, April 28, 2013) wrote and illustrated books for children. He worked with his wife Patricia to produce more than 100 books. A Long Hard Journey: The Story of the Pullman Porter earned the 1990 Coretta Scott King Medal and the 1990 Jane Addams Book Award. Sojourner Truth: Ain’t I a Woman? received a 1993 Coretta Scott King Honor Award. The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural was a 1993 Newbery Honor Book and the 1993 Coretta Scott King Medal winner. The McKissacks earned another Coretta Scott King Medal in 1995 for Christmas in the Big House, Christmas in the Quarters and still another Coretta Scott King Honor Award in 1997 for Rebels Against Slavery: American Slave Revolts. The McKissacks earned still more Coretta Scott King Honor Awards: one in 2000 for Black Hands, White Sails: The Story of African-American Whalers and one in 2004 for Days of Jubilee: The End of Slavery in the United States. Children could learn more at: http://www.bookologymagazine.com/resources/authors-emeritus/mckissack-fredrick/.

Walter Dean Myers (born Martinsburg, West Virginia, 1937; died New York, New York, July 1, 2014) wrote over 100 books for young adults. He earned six Coretta Scott King Awards: in 1980 for The Young Landlords, in 1985 for Motown and Didi, in 1989 for Fallen Angels, in 1993 for Somewhere in the Darkness (Honor Award), in 1994 for Malcolm X: By Any Means Necessary (Honor Award), and in 2000 for Monster (Honor Award). He earned two Newbery Honor Awards: in 1989 for Scorpions, and in 1993 for Somewhere in the Darkness. He received the first Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature in 2000 for Monster. He also received a 2004 Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Honor Award for Blues Journey. The Margaret A. Edwards Award was presented to him in 1994 for his body of work.

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Aug 132016
 

John Logie Baird (born Hellensburgh, Scotland, 1888; died Beyhill, England, June 14, 1946) was an early pioneer in television development.

William Caxton (born Kent, England, 1422; died London, England, 1491) was the first printer to publish a book in English. Older children could read some of his works at: http://www.gutenberg.org/.

Ruth Stiles Gannett (born New York, New York, 1923) writes books for children. Her book My Father’s Dragon received a 1949 Newbery Honor Award. Her other works include Katie and the Sad Noise. Children can read My Father’s Dragon at: http://www.gutenberg.org/

Alfred Hitchcock (born London, England, 1899; died Beverly Hills, California, April 29, 1980) was a movie director. He specialized in movies providing high suspense. Two of his most famous movies were The Thirty-Nine Steps and The Birds.

Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley (born Phoebe Ann Moses in Darke County, Ohio, 1860; died Greenville, Ohio, November 3, 1926) was a sharpshooter. She joined Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show in 1885. She amazed audiences for years with her skills, including shooting the cigarette out of her husband’s mouth. Idea: Children could find out how she got the last name Oakley. They might want to read Robert Quackenbush’s Who’s That Girl with the Gun?

Lucy Stone (born West Brookfield, Massachusetts, 1818; died Greenville, Ohio, November 2, 1926) campaigned for women’s rights. Her father did not believe women should have college educations. She had to work for nine years to earn the money to go to Oberlin College. Children could learn more at: http://www.nps.gov/wori/historyculture/lucy-stone.htm.

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Aug 142016
 

Julia Child (born Pasadena, California, 1912; died Santa Barbara, California, August 13, 2004)) was an author and a television chef. She always concluded her shows with “Bon Appétit!” Her kitchen was donated to the Smithsonian. Children could view a timeline of her life at: http://www.juliachildfoundation.org/timeline.html. Idea: Children could demonstrate to the class how to make simple foods.

Gary Larson (born Tacoma, Washington, 1950) is a cartoonist. He created The Far Side.

Alice Provensen (born Chicago, Illinois, 1918 or 1918) and her husband, Martin Provensen, wrote and illustrated children’s books. They earned a 1982 Caldecott Honor Award for  A Visit to William Blake’s Inn: Poems for Innocent and Experienced Travelers. They also received the 1984 Caldecott Medal for The Glorious Flight: Across the Channel with Louis Bleriot, July 25, 1909. 

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